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Is there a one-liner to read all the lines of a file in Python, rather than the standard:

f = open('x.txt')
cts =

Seems like this is done so often that there's got to be a one-liner. Any ideas?

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Funny, I needed this again and I googled for it. Never thought my own question would come up :) – Mike Caron May 10 '11 at 15:23
I also keep finding this when I am actually looking for… – tripleee Feb 6 '14 at 10:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 74 down vote accepted
f = open('x.txt').read()

if you want a single string, or

f = open('x.txt').readlines()

if you want a list of lines. Both don't guarantee the file is immediately closed (in practice it will be immediately closed in current CPython, but closed "only when the garbage collector gets around to it" in Jython, IronPython, and probably some future version of CPython).

A more solid approach (in 2.6+, or 2.5 with a from __future__ import with_statement) is

with open('x.txt') as x: f =


with open('x.txt') as x: f = x.readlines()

This variant DOES guarantee immediate closure of the file right after the reading.

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That's what I would have guessed, but didn't know when the opened file would be closed. Thanks! – Mike Caron Oct 27 '09 at 16:11

If you are on Python3, make sure you properly respect your file's input encoding, e.g.:

import codecs
with, 'r', encoding="utf8") as file:
    cts =

Find the list of codec names in the Python3 codec list. (The mechanism is also advisable for Python2 whenever you expect any non-ASCII input)

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