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I have a method, shown below, which calls a service.

How can I run this method through thread?

public List<AccessDetails> GetAccessListOfMirror(string mirrorId,string server)
{
    List<AccessDetails> accessOfMirror = new List<AccessDetails>();
    string loginUserId = SessionManager.Session.Current.LoggedInUserName;
    string userPassword = SessionManager.Session.Current.Password;

    using (Service1Client client = new Service1Client())
    {
        client.Open();
        accessOfMirror = client.GetMirrorList1(mirrorId, server, null);
    }

    return accessOfMirror;
}
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1  
What is the problem? –  Silvermind May 1 '13 at 13:29
    
He asked if, and then how you can run that method as a thread, given its return type. –  Shane.C May 1 '13 at 13:29
1  
Where should it put the result? If you are using C# 5, you should look at Async & Await –  Jens Kloster May 1 '13 at 13:30
2  
Why do you want to run this in a thread? What are you looking to gain from it? The reason I ask is that you have this post tagged ASP.NET which can provide different ways of solving this problem. If you spin this off on the thread and then have to wait for the result anyways, you gain no performance as the http request still takes the same amount of time. If you return your base page quickly then use AJAX to get this data as a separate request, it might give you better performance. Hence the question from @Silvermind, what is the problem? –  John Koerner May 1 '13 at 13:41
    
I am using .net4.0 framework. the resultant list will be used as datasource for my gridview. The service checks for user existance across 70 servers(each having 6 databases in Average) and fetches user details if exists. so the processing time is too long. thought of appliying threading so that the process could be run faster. –  smv May 1 '13 at 14:06
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In C# 3.5 or 4.0 you can do this.

var task = Task.Factory.StartNew<List<AccessDetails>>(() => GetAccessListOfMirror(mirrorId,server))
.ContinueWith(tsk => ProcessResult(tsk));

private void ProcessResult(Task task)
{
    var result = task.Result;
}

In C# 4.5 there's the await/async keywords which is some sugar for above

public async Task<List<AccessDetails>> GetAccessListOfMirror(string mirrorId,string server)

var myResult = await GetAccessListOfMirror(mirrorId, server)
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Try something like this:

public async Task<List<AccessDetails>> GetAccessListOfMirror(string mirrorId, string server)
    {
        List<AccessDetails> accessOfMirror = new List<AccessDetails>();
        string loginUserId = SessionManager.Session.Current.LoggedInUserName;
        string userPassword = SessionManager.Session.Current.Password;


        using (Service1Client client = new Service1Client())
        {
            client.Open();
            Task<List<AccessDetails>> Detail = client.GetMirrorList1(mirrorId, server, null);
            accessOfMirror = await Detail;

        }


        return accessOfMirror;
    }
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Below is a helper class I use, it references RX.NET.

If you include that in your project, then you can thread stuff very simply - the code above you could spin off to a separate thread as follows:

int mirrorId = 0;
string server = "xxx";
ASync.Run<List<AccessDetails>>(GetAccessListOfMirror(mirrorId,server), resultList => {
   foreach(var accessDetail in resultList)
   {
         // do stuff with result
   }
}, error => { // if error occured on other thread, handle exception here  });

Worth noting: that lambda expression is merged back to the original calling thread - which is very handy if you're initiating your async operations from a GUI thread for example.

It also has another very handy method: Fork lets you spin off multiple worker threads and causes the calling thread to block until all the sub-threads are either complete or errored.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;
using System.Concurrency;

namespace MyProject
{

    public static class ASync
    {
        public static void ThrowAway(Action todo)
        {
            ThrowAway(todo, null);
        }

        public static void ThrowAway(Action todo, Action<Exception> onException)
        {
            if (todo == null)
                return;

            Run<bool>(() =>
            {
                todo();
                return true;
            }, null, onException);
        }

        public static bool Fork(Action<Exception> onError, params Action[] toDo)
        {
            bool errors = false;
            var fork = Observable.ForkJoin(toDo.Select(t => Observable.Start(t).Materialize()));
            foreach (var x in fork.First())
                if (x.Kind == NotificationKind.OnError)
                {
                    if(onError != null)
                        onError(x.Exception);

                    errors = true;
                }

            return !errors;
        }

        public static bool Fork<T>(Action<Exception> onError, IEnumerable<T> args, Action<T> perArg)
        {
            bool errors = false;
            var fork = Observable.ForkJoin(args.Select(arg => Observable.Start(() => { perArg(arg); }).Materialize()));
            foreach (var x in fork.First())
                if (x.Kind == NotificationKind.OnError)
                {
                    if (onError != null)
                        onError(x.Exception);

                    errors = true;
                }

            return !errors;
        }


        public static void Run<TResult>(Func<TResult> todo, Action<TResult> continuation, Action<Exception> onException)
        {
            bool errored = false;
            IDisposable subscription = null;

            var toCall = Observable.ToAsync<TResult>(todo);
            var observable =
                Observable.CreateWithDisposable<TResult>(o => toCall().Subscribe(o)).ObserveOn(Scheduler.Dispatcher).Catch(
                (Exception err) =>
                {
                    errored = true;

                        if (onException != null)
                            onException(err);


                        return Observable.Never<TResult>();
                }).Finally(
                () =>
                {
                    if (subscription != null)
                        subscription.Dispose();
                });

            subscription = observable.Subscribe((TResult result) =>
            {
                if (!errored && continuation != null)
                {
                    try
                    {
                        continuation(result);
                    }
                    catch (Exception e)
                    {
                        if (onException != null)
                            onException(e);
                    }
                }
            });
        }
    }
}
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