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Pandas cut and qcut functions are great for 'bucketing' continuous data for use in pivot tables and so forth, but I can't see an easy way to get datetime axes in the mix. Frustrating since pandas is so great at all the time-related stuff!

Here's a simple example:

def randomDates(size, start=134e7, end=137e7):
    return np.array(np.random.randint(start, end, size), dtype='datetime64[s]')

df = pd.DataFrame({'ship' : randomDates(10), 'recd' : randomDates(10), 
                   'qty' : np.random.randint(0,10,10), 'price' : 100*np.random.random(10)})
df

     price      qty recd                ship
0    14.723510   3  2012-11-30 19:32:27 2013-03-08 23:10:12
1    53.535143   2  2012-07-25 14:26:45 2012-10-01 11:06:39
2    85.278743   7  2012-12-07 22:24:20 2013-02-26 10:23:20
3    35.940935   8  2013-04-18 13:49:43 2013-03-29 21:19:26
4    54.218896   8  2013-01-03 09:00:15 2012-08-08 12:50:41
5    61.404931   9  2013-02-10 19:36:54 2013-02-23 13:14:42
6    28.917693   1  2012-12-13 02:56:40 2012-09-08 21:14:45
7    88.440408   8  2013-04-04 22:54:55 2012-07-31 18:11:35
8    77.329931   7  2012-11-23 00:49:26 2012-12-09 19:27:40
9    46.540859   5  2013-03-13 11:37:59 2013-03-17 20:09:09

To bin by groups of price or quantity, I can use cut/qcut to bucket them:

df.groupby([pd.cut(df['qty'], bins=[0,1,5,10]), pd.qcut(df['price'],q=3)]).count()

                       price  qty recd ship
qty     price               
(0, 1]  [14.724, 46.541]   1   1   1   1
(1, 5]  [14.724, 46.541]   2   2   2   2
        (46.541, 61.405]   1   1   1   1
(5, 10] [14.724, 46.541]   1   1   1   1
        (46.541, 61.405]   2   2   2   2
         (61.405, 88.44]   3   3   3   3

But I can't see any easy way of doing the same thing with my 'recd' or 'ship' date fields. For example, generate a similar table of counts broken down by (say) monthly buckets of recd and ship. It seems like resample() has all of the machinery to bucket into periods, but I can't figure out how to apply it here. The buckets (or levels) in the 'date cut' would be equivalent to a pandas.PeriodIndex, and then I want to label each value of df['recd'] with the period it falls into?

So the kind of output I'm looking for would be something like:

ship    recv     count
2011-01 2011-01  1
        2011-02  3
        ...      ...
2011-02 2011-01  2
        2011-02  6
...     ...      ...

More generally, I'd like to be able to mix and match continuous or categorical variables in the output. Imagine df also contains a 'status' column with red/yellow/green values, then maybe I want to summarize counts by status, price bucket, ship and recd buckets, so:

ship    recv     price   status count
2011-01 2011-01  [0-10)   green     1
                            red     4
                 [10-20) yellow     2
                  ...      ...    ...
        2011-02  [0-10)  yellow     3
        ...      ...       ...    ...

As a bonus question, what's the simplest way to modify the groupby() result above to just contain a single output column called 'count'?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a solution using pandas.PeriodIndex (caveat: PeriodIndex doesn't seem to support time rules with a multiple > 1, such as '4M'). I think the answer to your bonus question is .size().

In [49]: df.groupby([pd.PeriodIndex(df.recd, freq='Q'),
   ....:             pd.PeriodIndex(df.ship, freq='Q'),
   ....:             pd.cut(df['qty'], bins=[0,5,10]),
   ....:             pd.qcut(df['price'],q=2),
   ....:            ]).size()
Out[49]: 
                qty      price 
2012Q2  2013Q1  (0, 5]   [2, 5]    1
2012Q3  2013Q1  (5, 10]  [2, 5]    1
2012Q4  2012Q3  (5, 10]  [2, 5]    1
        2013Q1  (0, 5]   [2, 5]    1
                (5, 10]  [2, 5]    1
2013Q1  2012Q3  (0, 5]   (5, 8]    1
        2013Q1  (5, 10]  (5, 8]    2
2013Q2  2012Q4  (0, 5]   (5, 8]    1
        2013Q2  (0, 5]   [2, 5]    1
share|improve this answer

Just need to set the index of the field you'd like to resample by, here's some examples

In [36]: df.set_index('recd').resample('1M',how='sum')
Out[36]: 
                 price  qty
recd                       
2012-07-31   64.151194    9
2012-08-31   93.476665    7
2012-09-30   94.193027    7
2012-10-31         NaN  NaN
2012-11-30         NaN  NaN
2012-12-31   12.353405    6
2013-01-31         NaN  NaN
2013-02-28  129.586697    7
2013-03-31         NaN  NaN
2013-04-30         NaN  NaN
2013-05-31  211.979583   13

In [37]: df.set_index('recd').resample('1M',how='count')
Out[37]: 
2012-07-31  price    1
            qty      1
            ship     1
2012-08-31  price    1
            qty      1
            ship     1
2012-09-30  price    2
            qty      2
            ship     2
2012-10-31  price    0
            qty      0
            ship     0
2012-11-30  price    0
            qty      0
            ship     0
2012-12-31  price    1
            qty      1
            ship     1
2013-01-31  price    0
            qty      0
            ship     0
2013-02-28  price    2
            qty      2
            ship     2
2013-03-31  price    0
            qty      0
            ship     0
2013-04-30  price    0
            qty      0
            ship     0
2013-05-31  price    3
            qty      3
            ship     3
dtype: int64
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't seem like a general solution, e.g. if I want to group on two different dates, or a date and a non-date (via cut or category variable). I'll update the question with the structure of output I'm looking for. –  patricksurry May 1 '13 at 14:22

How about using Series and putting the parts of the DataFrame that you're interested into that, then calling cut on the series object?

price_series = pd.Series(df.price.tolist(), index=df.recd)

and then

 pd.qcut(price_series, q=3)

and so on. (Though I think @Jeff's answer is best)

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I came up with an idea that relies on the underlying storage format of datetime64[ns]. If you define dcut() like this

def dcut(dts, freq='d', right=True):
    hi = pd.Period(dts.max(), freq=freq) + 1   # get first period past end of data
    periods = pd.PeriodIndex(start=dts.min(), end=hi, freq=freq)
    # get a list of integer bin boundaries representing ns-since-epoch
    # note the extra period gives us the extra right-hand bin boundary we need
    bounds = np.array(periods.to_timestamp(how='start'), dtype='int')
    # bin our time field as integers
    cut = pd.cut(np.array(dts, dtype='int'), bins=bounds, right=right)
    # relabel the bins using the periods, omitting the extra one at the end
    cut.levels = periods[:-1].format()
    return cut

Then we can do what I wanted:

df.groupby([dcut(df.recd, freq='m', right=False),dcut(df.ship, freq='m', right=False)]).count()

To get:

                price qty recd ship
2012-07 2012-10   1    1    1    1
2012-11 2012-12   1    1    1    1
        2013-03   1    1    1    1  
2012-12 2012-09   1    1    1    1
        2013-02   1    1    1    1  
2013-01 2012-08   1    1    1    1
2013-02 2013-02   1    1    1    1
2013-03 2013-03   1    1    1    1
2013-04 2012-07   1    1    1    1
        2013-03   1    1    1    1  

I guess you could similarly define dqcut() which first "rounds" each datetime value to the integer representing the start of its containing period (at your specified frequency), and then uses qcut() to choose amongst those boundaries. Or do qcut() first on the raw integer values and round the resulting bins based on your chosen frequency?

No joy on the bonus question yet? :)

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