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I have a code something similar to this

struct time
{
    long milliscnds;
    int  secs;
}

In my java file , I had something like this

class jtime
{
    long millscnds;
    int  secs;
}

new jtime time = new jtime();

public int native getTimeFromC(object time);

in native class

getTimeFromc(JNIEnv* env, jobject thiz,jobject jtime)
 {
   struct time *mytime = getTime(); 

  now to fill the jtime with mytime
 }

Suggestions please?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Something like the following:

void getTimeFromc(JNIEnv* env, jobject thiz, jobject jtime)
{
    struct time *mytime = getTime(); 

    // now to fill the jtime with mytime
    jclass jtimeClazz = (*env)->GetObjectClass(jtime); // Get the class for the jtime object
    // get the field IDs for the two instance fields
    jfieldID millscndsFieldId = (*env)->GetFieldID(jtimeClazz, "milliscnds", "J"); // 'J' is the JNI type signature for long
    jfieldID secsFieldId = (*env)->GetFieldID(jtimeClazz, "secs", "I"); // 'I' is the JNI type signature for int
    // set the fields
    (*env)->SetLongField(jtime, millscndsFieldId, (jlong)mytime.milliscnds);
    (*env)->SetIntField(jtime, secsFieldId, (jint)mytime.secs);
}

Ideally you should cache the values of millscndsFieldId and secsFieldId as they won't change during execution (and you could also cache jtimeClazz if you NewGlobalRef it).

All JNI functions are documented here: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/jni/spec/functions.html

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Thank you very much , i have a doubt , can i free the struct after setting the java members ...? –  Naruto May 2 '13 at 7:04
    
Yep, there is no shared memory here - you're copying the values –  GooseSerbus May 3 '13 at 7:36

You can simplify your Java class and the required JNI code.

Currently, your native method has some issues:

public int native getTimeFromC(object time);
  1. Parameter is Object but should be jtime.
  2. Return value doesn't seem to have a purpose.
  3. Since the method completely initializes a jtime object, why not create and return a jtime object?

This class definition has a factory method to create the object and a constructor that moves some the initialization work over from the JNI side.

public class jtime {

    long millscnds;
    int  secs;

    public jtime(long millscnds, int secs) {
        this.millscnds = millscnds;
        this.secs = secs;
    }

    public native static jtime FromC();
}

The factory method can be implemented like this:

JNIEXPORT jobject JNICALL Java_jtime_FromC
  (JNIEnv * env, jclass clazz)
{
    struct time *mytime = getTime();

    jmethodID ctor = (*env)->GetMethodID(env, clazz, "<init>", "(JI)V");
    jobject obj = (*env)->NewObject(env, clazz, ctor, mytime->milliscnds, mytime->secs);

    return obj;
}

Tip: The javap tool is like javah but shows the signatures of non-native methods. Using javap -s jtime, you can see the signature of the constructor.

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Thanks for the answer , i am intentionally returning int which sends me the result which i need in future –  Naruto May 3 '13 at 9:54

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