Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Before anyone says anything I'm asking this out of curiosity only; I'm not planning to do any premature optimization based off of this answer.

My question is about speed in using reflection and casting. The standard saying is 'reflection is slow'. My question is what part exactly is slow, and why; particularly in comparing if something is a parent of another instance.

I'm pretty confident that just comparing the class of an object to another Class object is about as fast as any comparison, presumably just doing direct comparison of singleton objects that are already stored int he Object's state; but what if one class is a parent of the other?

I usually think of instanceof as being about as fast as regular class checking, but today I thought about it and it seems that some reflection has to happen 'under the scenes' for instanceof to work. I checked online and found a few places where someone said instanceof is slow; presumably due to reflection required to compare the parent of an object?

This lead to the next question, what about just casting. If I cast something as an object it's not I get a ClassCastException. But this doesn't happen if a cast an object to a parent of itself. Essentially I'm doing an instanceof call, or logic to that effect, when I do the cast at run time am I not? I've never heard anyone hint that casting an object could be slow before. Admittedly not all casts are to a parent of the provided object, but plenty of casts are to parent classes. Yet never has anyone hinted at all that this could be slow.

So which is it. Is instanceof really not that slow? Are both instanceof and casting to parent class kind of slow? or is there some reason a cast can be done faster then an instanceof call?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Andrew Thompson, Aubin, Reimeus, Mat, antony.trupe May 1 '13 at 18:15

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
If it matters, benchmark. If not, well, ... –  Mat May 1 '13 at 14:31
1  
it would depend on the probability that the object is an instance of the appropriate class. If the probability is high, then exceptions would be faster. If the probability is 1, then exceptions would be a no-brainer. If the probability is 0, then you should consider another strategy altogether. In between, you need to benchmark. –  emory May 1 '13 at 14:40
    
@emory I had thought that would be true, but see my profiling results, even if you're 99% sure that it is the approriate class it still ends up being no faster to use exceptions. And if you're not 99% sure its much much slower –  Richard Tingle May 1 '13 at 14:57
    
@Richtea interesting ... thus if the probability is 0 you should be doing something else; (0,0.99] don't use exceptions, .99 your call, (.99,1.00] use exceptions. –  emory May 1 '13 at 15:01
    
@emory well: thus if the probability is 0 you should be doing something else; (0,0.99] don't use exceptions, (.99,1.00] your call, [1.00] don't do anything, its 1.00. Exceptions are never better, sometimes they're as good, but rarely –  Richard Tingle May 1 '13 at 15:06
show 1 more comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As always try it and see in your particular situations, but:

-Exceptions are expensive, remarkably so.

-Using exceptions for code flow is almost always a bad idea

Edit: Ok I was interested so I wrote a quick test system

public class Test{

    public Test(){
        B b=new B();
        C c=new C();


        for(int i=0;i<10000;i++){
            testUsingInstanceOf(b);
            testUsingInstanceOf(c);
            testUsingException(b);
            testUsingException(c);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){

        Test test=new Test();

    }

    public static boolean testUsingInstanceOf(A possiblyB){
        if (possiblyB instanceof B){
            return true;
        }else{
            return false;
        }
    }
    public static boolean testUsingException(A possiblyB){
        try{
            B b=(B)possiblyB;
            return true;
        }catch(Exception e){
            return false;
        }
    }


    private class A{

    }
    private class B extends A{

    }
    private class C extends A{

    }        
}

Profile results:

by InstanceOf: 4.43 ms
by Exception: 79.4 ms

as I say, remarkably expensive

And even when its always going to be a B (simulating when you're 99% sure its B you just need to be sure its still no faster:

Profile results when always B:

by InstanceOf: 4.48 ms
by Exception: 4.51 ms
share|improve this answer
    
Both points are very valid. –  Theodoros Chatzigiannakis May 1 '13 at 14:35
    
So by our two profile results there is no circumstance where allowing exceptions to be thrown and catching them would be faster –  Richard Tingle May 1 '13 at 14:51
    
hmm, interesting, but there is one other situation that wasn't tested in this example. What if you don't catch the exception; instead intentinoally letting it propigate up to another method designed to handle bizzar runtime exceptions (say by reverting a transaction)? I'm not saying I want to do that; just that I'm curious and always try to find edge casses lol. –  dsollen May 1 '13 at 14:56
    
Ok, I've tried that, exception based test changed to casting and just returning true (no catch and return false block). One try catch block right at the top of the program that never catches anything because its ALWAYS class B. Using Exception (or lack thereof):4.19ms, using instanceOf:4.18. So best case senario, they're the same –  Richard Tingle May 1 '13 at 15:03
add comment

There is a general answer and a particular answer.

General case

if (/* guard against exception */) {
    /* do something that would throw an exception */
} else {
    /* recover */
}

// versus

try {
   /* do something that would throw an exception */
} catch (TheException ex) {
   /* recover */
}

It is a fact that creating/throwing/catching an exception is expensive. And they are likely to be significantly more expensive than doing the test. However, that doesn't mean that the "test first" version is always faster. This is because in the "test first" version, the tests may actually be performed: first time in the if, and second time in the code that would throw the exception.

When you take that into account, it is clear that if the cost of the (extra) test is large enough and the relative frequency of exceptions is small enough, "test first" will actually be slower. For example, in:

if (file.exists() && file.isReadable()) {
    is = new FileInputStream(file);
} else {
    System.err.println("missing file");
}

versus

try {
    is = new FileInputStream(file);
} catch (IOException ex) {
    System.err.println("missing file");
}

the "test first" approach performs 2 extra system calls, and system calls are expensive. If the "missing file" scenario is also unusual ....

The second confounding factor is that the most recent HotSpot JIT compilers do some significant optimization of exceptions. In particular, if the JIT compiler can figure out that the state of the exception object is not used, it may turn the exception create/throw/catch into a simple jump instruction.

The specific case of instanceof

In this case we are most likely comparing these two:

if (o instanceof Foo) {
    Foo f = (Foo) o;
    /* ... */
} 

// versus

try {
    Foo f = (Foo) o;
} catch (ClassCastException ex) {
   /* */
}

Here a second optimization occurs. An instanceof followed by a type cast is a common pattern. A HotSpot JIT compiler can often eliminate the dynamic type check that is performed by the type cast ... since this is repeating a test that just succeeded. When you factor this in, it the "test first" version cannot be slower than the "exception" version ... even if the latter is optimized to a jump.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If the cast can throw an exception, it means that it's doing implicitly what instanceof would do. So, in both cases you are implicitly using reflection, probably in exactly the same way.

The difference is that if the result of instanceof comes back false, no more reflection is happening. If a cast fails and an exception is thrown, you'll have unrolling of the execution stack and, quite possibly, more reflection (for the runtime to determine the correct catch block, based on whether the thrown exception object is an instance of the type to be caught).

The above logic tells me that an instanceof check should be faster. Of course, benchmarking for your particular case would give you the definitive answer.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I don't think you would find one being clearly better than the other.

For instanceof, the work done use memory and cpu time. Creating a exception use memory and cpu time also. Which use less of each, only a well done benchmark would give you that answer.

Coding-wise, I would prefer to see a instanceof rather than casting and having to manage exceptions.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.