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I have a program that pulls "work" from a database then dispatches it to workers.

I have a thread dedicated to doing some work in a loop. The work it does comes from a database, and the call to get a message is blocking:

class MessageThread(Thread):
    def __init__(self, db, worker_inbox, *args, **kwargs):
        super(MessageThread, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.db = db
        self.worker_inbox = worker_inbox  # this is a stdlib Queue.Queue

    def run(self):
        while True:
            message = self.db.get()
            self.worker_inbox.put(message)

Without having to put some "flag" into the database, is there a nice way to stop this thread? Currently I am setting the daemon flag on it, which kills it when the main thread exits, but I wondered if there was a nicer mechanism or way of designing this?

share|improve this question
    
db looks like a Queue. How is db defined? Why not put a sentinel in db? –  unutbu May 1 '13 at 14:40
    
Sure, db is a queue, but the work is put there by various other processes so it is not a stdlib queue. I don't want to put a sentinel in the DB -- that is mixing implementation with the data. I'd rather learn if there is a standard way of architecting for this kind of scenario. –  coleifer May 1 '13 at 15:03
    
@coleifer Can you put a timeout on .get? If yes, then you could simply set a shared flag ALIVE and use while ALIVE: with timeout. –  freakish May 1 '13 at 15:06
    
Yeah, I'm using an Event to signal when threads should shutdown. The thing is, let's pretend that there is no .get(timeout=x) API. –  coleifer May 1 '13 at 15:09
    
@coleifer Well, I don't think there is anything else you can do without timeout and without sentinel in db. –  freakish May 1 '13 at 15:14

2 Answers 2

Have your code look for a unique stop message in the queue. If it is normally passed some object, a string that says 'stop' is a nice quick self-documenting way to do it. When its time to terminate the worker, just drop 'stop' into the queue. This wakes the thread and tells it its done. You can use a Boolean, none or something that fits in the message you are passing.

while True:
    message = self.db.get()
    if instance(message, base string) and message == 'stop':
        break
    ...
share|improve this answer

if db is a queue of messages then I would just put some "quit" fake message to this queue. Here is some pseudo code how it might look.

class MessageThread(Thread):
    def __init__(self, db, worker_inbox, *args, **kwargs):
        super(MessageThread, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.db = db
        self.worker_inbox = worker_inbox  # this is a stdlib Queue.Queue

    def run(self):
        while True:
            message = self.db.get()
            if "quit" == message:
                return
            self.worker_inbox.put(message)
    def quit(self):
        self.db.put("quit")

 a = MessageThread()
 a.start()
 sleep(1.0)
 a.quit()
 a.join()
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