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Suppose we have a method like

public static IThing getTheThing() {
    return internalThingGetter();
}

And we want to for purposes of debugging or unit testing, introduce a lightweight strategy to manually override this.

private static IThing _thingManualOverride;

public static IThing getTheThing() {
    if (/*some condition*/)
        return _thingManualOverride;
    else
        return internalThingGetter();
}

Is it better to check _thingManualOverride != null or introduce a new boolean value and check, for example, _shouldOverride?

Or, is there a more solid pattern to use here?

EDIT: Some goals to satisfy:

  • Presume that keeping the interface is important. Lots of code uses this static method, and changing it is a nice goal, but expensive.
  • Both checks are "correct" in that if the override is null we could safely assume that the default course is the correct one.
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2  
I'm assuming that null is not a valid value then for IThing _thingManualOverride? –  Chris Sinclair May 1 '13 at 15:07
    
@ChrisSinclair Excellent point. I've made some edits hopefully to clarify this. –  maxwellb May 1 '13 at 15:10
    
Also, when you say "a lightweight strategy", do you mean it's runtime efficient/fast, or easy to write/maintain/duplicate? –  Chris Sinclair May 1 '13 at 15:11
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is not an answer, just a recommendation. It would benefit you to read chapter three of The Art Of Unit Testing written by Roy Osherove (even better, go out and buy, and read the whole book - it's great!). Specifically section 3.4.5 (below is a link to the sample Chapter 3 that contains the section):

Art Of Unit Testing - Sample Chapter 3

Update: Per your request for an example of using a static factory class:

static class ThingFactory
{
  private static IThing _thingManualOverride = null;

  public static IThing getTheThing() 
  {
    if (_thingManualOverride != null)
      return _thingManualOverride;

    return new internalThingGetter();
  }

  public static void SetThing(IThing thing)
  {
    _thingManualOverride = thing;
  }
}

I will add that I do not like using this pattern. If you have the opportunity to refactor, it might be wise to consider it. The main reason I don't like using this is because you have to remember to reset the state (call the SetThing method with a null parameter) after each test so you do not affect other tests with your manual override.

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thanks! I have a copy right next to me at this moment. I will flip to 3.4.5 presently. –  maxwellb May 1 '13 at 15:06
    
I think this is exactly what I was looking for. If you can provide some code sample which wraps this in the factory and keeps the static interface above, I will accept this answer. I'll start coding this right now! –  maxwellb May 1 '13 at 15:12
    
Thanks, I might even extract a second factory, and wrap it in the static method. –  maxwellb May 1 '13 at 15:56
    
Thank you for the words of caution. In my case there are orthogonal goals of testing and refactoring. But others reading this answer should be aware of the pitfalls of using this for new code. –  maxwellb May 1 '13 at 16:56
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If would go for _thingManualOverride != null. You could check another fields, lets say a boolean called '_IsThingManualOverrideSet", but by a mistake of the programmer they could give conflicting values:

_thingManualOverride = null;
_IsThingManualOverrideSet = true; // <-- oops!

So checking the value itself is the best way.

share|improve this answer
    
Upvoted for stress on clarity and intent. With that in mind, however, the boolean isn't so bad, since it forces intent, but it does duplicate it. It turns into somewhat of a two-key ignition switch, violating DRY. –  maxwellb May 1 '13 at 16:47
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For the purporse of unit-testing it is better to get rid of static method in the factory, and make virtual method. That way you can replace its return value using mocks.

class Factory{    
   public virtual IThing getTheThing() {
      return internalThingGetter();
   }
}

In tests, using Moq framework :

var m = new Mock<Factory>();
m.Setup(f=>f.getTheThing())
 .Returns(thingManualOverride);
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2  
I do not think this is an answer to his question. I do agree your approach is much better, but he is not asking for general tips to improve unittesting. –  Martin Mulder May 1 '13 at 15:01
1  
@MartinMulder, I think that is exactly what he is asking - "Or, is there a more solid pattern to use here?" –  alex May 1 '13 at 15:02
    
@alex, Thank you, and while I agree that this better for unit testing in general, I'm trying to figure out what to do if I do need to keep the current interface. –  maxwellb May 1 '13 at 15:03
2  
So, yes, this is a good answer in itself, and probably does not deserve a -1, but I probably won't accept it, since it does not answer the question. It is a valid point to leave for passers-by. –  maxwellb May 1 '13 at 15:05
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You could create a helper class to do this for you, perhaps something like this:

public class OverridableValue<T>
{
    private readonly Func<T> OriginalValueGetter;
    private Func<T> ValueGetter;

    public OverridableValue(Func<T> valueGetter)
    {
        this.OriginalValueGetter = valueGetter;
        this.ValueGetter = OriginalValueGetter;
    }

    public T Value
    {
        get 
        {
            return ValueGetter();
        }
    }

    public void SetValueOverride(T value)
    {
        if (value == null)
            ValueGetter = OriginalValueGetter;
        else
            ValueGetter = () => value;
    }
}

Usage might look like:

private static readonly OverridableValue<IThing> _thingManualOverride = new OverridableValue<IThing>(internalThingGetter);

public static IThing getTheThing() {
    return _thingManualOverride.Value;
}

Where overriding it is as simple as:

_thingManualOverride.SetValueOverride(new Thing2());

You can easily swap the null check in SetValueOverride for something else, or simply define a new method to RemoveOverride() which would help when a null value is considered valid override:

public void SetValueOverride(T value)
{
    ValueGetter = () => value;
}

public void RemoveOverride()
{
    ValueGetter = OriginalValueGetter;
}

Another benefit is that this override should (I think) be generally thread-safe (you won't be in a case where some IsOverriddenFlag is true but then have no override value).

EDIT: You could do the value overriding in a Value setter, but I thought that would look weird in practice:

public T Value
{
    get 
    {
        return ValueGetter();
    }
    set
    {
        if (value == null)
            ValueGetter = OriginalValueGetter;
        else
            ValueGetter = () => value;
    }
}

myThing = _thingManualOverride.Value; //Thing1
_thingManualOverride.Value = new Thing2();
myThing = _thingManualOverride.Value; //Thing2
_thingManualOverride.Value = null;
myThing = _thingManualOverride.Value; //Thing1 ... not null!?
share|improve this answer
    
This seems like it would boil down to creating a new layer to do the same thing. It seems like putting the same question in a different place. –  maxwellb May 1 '13 at 15:55
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