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In my code I have a vector that holds integers. Using the first loop I create 100 new integers and push them on the vector. The next loop then deletes all the dynamically allocated integers with the exception of the last, because the deletion of the last integer causes the error and returns 0xc0000005. Why does my program crash with the deletion of the last integer?

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<int> list;

    cout << list.size() << endl;

    int i = 0;
    while(i!=100)
    {
        list.push_back(*(new int(12)));
        i++;
    }

    cout << list.size() << endl;

    i=0;
    while(i!=99)
    {
        delete &list.back();
        list.pop_back();
        i++;
    }
/*
    delete &list.back();

    list.pop_back();
*/
    cout << list.size() << endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
If you create a vector<int>, std::vector will handle the allocation. You don't need to allocate the integers yourself. – Aleph May 1 '13 at 14:54
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are not doing what you think you are. What are pushed in to the vector are not dynamically allocated ints but a copy of the values of the dynamically allocated ints.

So on this part

list.push_back(*(new int(12)));

you create a new int on heap with value 12 and then copy its value in to the vector. So you can not do

delete &list.back();

on the ints.

That fact tat you had to take the address of the value should tell you that it is actually not a pointer in there.


If you want to store the pointers then use

vector<int*> list;
          ^^

and push like

list.push_back(new int(12));

and you can delete as

delete list.back();

However just don't do it. No need to dynamically allocate ints. use

vector<int> list;
list.push_back(12);
// Nothing needs to be deleted.
share|improve this answer
1  
"However just don't do it." indeed. If it is really necessary for your vector to contain pointers to integers then use an appropriate smart pointer; or use std::vector<std::vector<Type>> instead. Mixing pointers and STL is a horrific habit. – Equalities of polynomials May 1 '13 at 16:14
    
Thank you so much! Your explanation makes a lot of sense and I understand where I went wrong. Thanks, again! – David Bos May 1 '13 at 16:17
    
@DavidBos Glad I could Help. Take it easy on the pointers and dynamic allocation :) – stardust May 1 '13 at 16:19

When you do list.push_back(*new int(12));you just add the number 12 to the vector, after this operation &vector.back() is not equal to the address new int(12) returned. You can move new int(12) to previous line, store the result and verify yourself.

I wonder why it doesn't crash on the first iteration of the deletion loop.

share|improve this answer

Why are you even trying to use new and delete! If you had a vector of pointers there might be some reason to use new, but you have a vectors of ints. So just push ints onto your vector.

while(i!=100)
{
    list.push_back(12);
    i++;
}

cout << list.size() << endl;
list.clear();

It amazes me the way newbies are addicted to new, delete, pointers etc. C++ is easier than that!

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I realize that now. I was overthinking things enormously :P – David Bos May 1 '13 at 16:18

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