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Maybe a basic question but let us say I have a string that is 2000 characters long, I need to split this string into max 512 character chunks each.

Is there a nice way, like a loop or so for doing this?

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Are you sure you need 512 char chunks? Because that is different from 512 bytes which is a more common constraint. –  Henk Holterman Oct 27 '09 at 16:44
1  
@Henk: On the other hand, splitting text into chunks based on bytes would be pretty odd - the results would depend on the encoding. –  Jon Skeet Oct 27 '09 at 16:46
    
Jon, yes, a common problem when re-assembling the text again. But some I/O channels operate in 512 byte blocks. –  Henk Holterman Oct 27 '09 at 16:49
    
@Jon and @Henk: the string in C# is defined to contain UTF-16 characters internally, encoding is not relevant in memory, once you write it to disk (or elsewhere), encoding becomes relevant and influences the stored byte size. –  Abel Oct 27 '09 at 17:22
    
Abel, I know and so does Jon. I was asking meep to confirm at what level the condition applies. 512 is a much rounder number for bytes than for chars. –  Henk Holterman Oct 27 '09 at 17:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Something like this:

private IList<string> SplitIntoChunks(string text, int chunkSize)
{
    List<string> chunks = new List<string>();
    int offset = 0;
    while (offset < text.Length)
    {
        int size = Math.Min(chunkSize, text.Length - offset);
        chunks.Add(text.Substring(offset, size));
        offset += size;
    }
    return chunks;
}

Or just to iterate over:

private IEnumerable<string> SplitIntoChunks(string text, int chunkSize)
{
    int offset = 0;
    while (offset < text.Length)
    {
        int size = Math.Min(chunkSize, text.Length - offset);
        yield return text.Substring(offset, size);
        offset += size;
    }
}
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dammit Jon you beat me to it, and I used your implementation too... –  Stan R. Oct 27 '09 at 16:55
    
I learned a lot from this one. Accept and +1. Very nice! –  janhartmann Oct 27 '09 at 17:03

using Jon's implementation and the yield keyword.

IEnumerable<string> Chunks(string strText, int chunkSize)
{
    for (int offset = 0; offset < text.Length; offset += size)
    {
        int size = Math.Min(chunkSize, text.Length - offset);
        yield return text.Substring(offset, size);
    }
}
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Interesting use of for vs my while... I'm trying to decide which is easier to read. You don't need the yield break at the end, btw. –  Jon Skeet Oct 27 '09 at 22:27
    
I took the liberty to fix the redundant yield break as @Jon mentioned –  Louis Rhys Sep 10 '13 at 7:15
    
thanks, @LouisRhys :) –  Stan R. Sep 11 '13 at 13:40

Though this question meanwhile has an accepted answer, here's a short version with the help of regular expressions. Purists may not like it (understandably) but when you need a quick solution and you are handy with regexes, this can be it. Performance is rather good, surprisingly:

string [] split = Regex.Split(yourString, @"(?<=\G.{512})");

What it does? Negative look-backward and remembering the last position with \G. It will also catch the last bit, even if it isn't dividable by 512.

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Useful for inspecting long strings in Immediate Window. –  Dialecticus May 21 '14 at 16:52
static IEnumerable<string> Split(string str, int chunkSize)    
{   
    int len = str.Length;
    return Enumerable.Range(0, len / chunkSize).Select(i => str.Substring(i * chunkSize, chunkSize));    
}

source: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1450774/c-split-a-string-into-equal-chunks-each-of-size-4

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+1 for creativity, -1 for performance and readability –  Foxfire Oct 27 '09 at 16:42
8  
Fails to provide the final chunk in this case. –  Jon Skeet Oct 27 '09 at 16:45

I will dare to provide a more LINQified version of Jon's solution, based on the fact that the string type implements IEnumerable<char>:

private IList<string> SplitIntoChunks(string text, int chunkSize)
{
    var chunks = new List<string>();
    int offset = 0;
    while(offset < text.Length) {
        chunks.Add(new string(text.Skip(offset).Take(chunkSize).ToArray()));
        offset += chunkSize;
    }
    return chunks;
}
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1  
I did consider that - particularly as MoreLINQ provides a nice Partition method for this sort of thing. However, the efficiency of this would be absolutely horrible :( –  Jon Skeet Oct 27 '09 at 16:48
    
It is good to know that, since I tend to use LINQ for everything... –  Konamiman Oct 27 '09 at 16:49
    
btw String, does not have an extension method for "Skip" you would have to do ToCharArray first. –  Stan R. Oct 27 '09 at 16:55
    
and I know it implements IEnumerable<char> which makes it that much more baffling... –  Stan R. Oct 27 '09 at 16:58
1  
"foo".Skip(2) works fine for me... –  Joel Mueller Oct 27 '09 at 17:21

Something like?

Calculate eachLength = StringLength / WantedCharLength
Then for (int i = 0; i < StringLength; i += eachLength)
SubString (i, eachLength);
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1  
Is this C#?.... –  Abel May 23 '14 at 20:00

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