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#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    float a = 5;
    printf("%d", a);
    return 0;
}

This gives the output:

0

Why is the output zero?

share|improve this question
    
Use code formatting. –  Ree Oct 27 '09 at 16:35
    
#include <conio.h> removed because not needed - other cleanups too. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 27 '09 at 17:01

8 Answers 8

Because printf doesn't have a prototype for its arguments beyond the formatting string, your float argument is promoted to double, per §6.5.2.2 paragraph 6 of the standard. The value 5.0 as a double has the representation:

0x4014000000000000

so that gets stored to memory in the location that printf will look for its first argument.

When printf processes your formatting string and encounters %d, it loads an int from that memory address. Because you are on a little-endian machine on which int is 32 bits (or smaller, depending on the actual system), it interprets the low bits of the double you passed as the integer to be printed. Since the low word of the representation of 5.0 is exactly zero, it prints 0.

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+1 point for describing mechanizm in detail –  PiotrK Oct 27 '09 at 17:08
3  
Note: The behaviour is undefined, and different for different implementations. On my 64-bit Linux system, gcc as well as clang pass the double in a floating point register, but with the %d format, printf takes the value from esi, so it prints whatever bits happen to be in that register interpreted as an int. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 1 '12 at 19:52
    
This is interesting but not entirely correct. If I pass a double j=7.55, which is 0x3333333333331e40, to a %d parameter, it still prints zero (likely for the reason @Daniel Fischer pointed out). –  Claudiu May 3 at 18:35

It doesn't print 5 because the compiler does not know to automatically cast to an integer. You need to do (int)a yourself.

That is to say,

#include<stdio.h>
void main()
{
float a=5;
printf("%d",(int)a);
}

correctly outputs 5.

Compare that program with

#include<stdio.h>
void print_int(int x)
{
printf("%d\n", x);
}
void main()
{
float a=5;
print_int(a);
}

where the compiler directly knows to cast the float to an int, due to the declaration of print_int.

share|improve this answer
    
Specifically, it doesn't know to automatically cast to an integer in a variadic function, but that's rather hard to explain to the beginner, particularly since it sure looks like the C compiler should know the types involved. –  David Thornley Oct 27 '09 at 17:18
1  
Besides the variadic-ness, knowing what type to cast would require the compiler to parse the string passed to printf and deduce what type a is supposed to be. GCC can easily handle a constant "%d\n" and warn you when passed -Wall, but good luck when the string isn't hard-coded into the program! –  Mark Rushakoff Oct 27 '09 at 19:05
    
@MarkRushakoff Reasonable programmers don't use non-constant format strings, since they introduce a security issue. –  user529758 Oct 20 '13 at 9:44

%d format specifier can only be used with values of type int. You are passing a double (which float will be implicitly converted to). The resultant behavior is undefined. There no answer to "why it prints 0?" question. Anything can be printed. In fact, anything can happen.

P.S.

  1. That's int main, not void main.
  2. There's no such header as conio.h in standard C.
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for pointing out that printf() is passed a double. I fixed the code to remove the superfluous and irrelevant #include <conio.h>. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 27 '09 at 17:02

You have to use a different formatting string, just have a look at http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/printf/

printf("%f", a);

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You should either cast it to an int to use %d, or use a format string to display the float with no decimal precision:

void main() {
  float a=5;
  printf("%d",(int)a); // This casts to int, which will make this work
  printf("%.0f",a); // This displays with no decimal precision
}
share|improve this answer

You need to use %f instead of %d - %d is just for integers while %f is for floating point:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
void main()
{
  float a=5;
  printf("%f",a);
}
share|improve this answer

You'll want to use %f for printing a float value.

eg

float a=5;
printf("%f",a);
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As the other people said, you need to use %f in the format string or convert a to an int.

But I want to point out that your compiler, probably, knows about printf()'s format string and can tell you you're using it wrong. My compiler, with the appropriate invocation (-Wall includes -Wformat), says this:

$ /usr/bin/gcc -Wformat tmp.c
tmp.c: In function ‘main’:
tmp.c:4: warning: format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘double’

$ /usr/bin/gcc -Wall tmp.c
tmp.c: In function ‘main’:
tmp.c:4: warning: format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘double’

$

Oh, and one more thing: you should include '\n' in the printf() to ensure the output is sent to the output device.

printf("%d\n", a);
/*        ^^ */

or use fflush(stdout); after the printf().

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