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I'm having to deal with collections of data being thrown at my application from data sources out of my control. Some of these collections contain nulls which I would prefer to filter out as soon as they hit my code rather than scatter null checking code all over the place. I want to do this in a reusable generic fashion and have written this method to do it:

    public static void RemoveNulls<T>(this IList<T> collection) where T : class
    {
        for (var i = 0; i < collection.Count(); i++)
        {
            if (collection[i] == null)
                collection.RemoveAt(i);
        }
    }

I know on the concrete List class there is the RemoveAll() method that could be used like:

collection.RemoveAll(x => x == null);

But a lot of the return types are interface based (IList/ IList ...) rather than concrete types.

share|improve this question
1  
Please could you elaborate more why you cannot use RemoveAll? – Cuong Le May 1 '13 at 15:21
1  
And what is the question? – Hossein Narimani Rad May 1 '13 at 15:22
2  
The code you've written won't work, because removing an item shifts the indexes of all subsequent elements down by 1. Every time you remove a null, your code will skip checking the next element. – Jeremy Todd May 1 '13 at 15:25
    
Why the downvotes!?!?? – Jammer May 1 '13 at 15:31
    
People can be such pedants around here ... – Jammer May 1 '13 at 15:32
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Instead of removing nulls from source collection, you can create a copy of collection without nulls using LINQ:

collection.Where(i => i != null).ToList();

Extension methods would work on any IEnumerable, including IList.

share|improve this answer
    
Why copy a whole collection needlessly? – Jammer May 1 '13 at 15:30
3  
@Jammer, you can also drop the .ToList() part so that it would work as a filter. If you care about performance, keep in mind that every RemoveAt will move all list items that come after the removed one. So if you remove 10 items from the beginning of the list with 1000 items, at least 990 items would be moved in memory 10 times. – alex May 1 '13 at 15:33
1  
It may actually improve performance, since removing elements from an IList (at least with an array backing like List<T>) will force the copying of all subsequent elements down one slot every time you do it. – Jeremy Todd May 1 '13 at 15:34
    
@Jammer I'd recommend running some performance tests using this solution vs the in-place solution. If you average more than two nulls per collection I'd bet this will run faster. – Dax Fohl May 1 '13 at 15:37

Your method won't work because removing an element will cause the index of all subsequent elements to be decremented. If you don't want a Linq solution (which seems simplest: see the answer from @alex), you should iterate backwards.

public static void RemoveNulls<T>(this IList<T> collection) where T : class
{
    for (var i = collection.Count-1; i >= 0 ; i--)
    {
        if (collection[i] == null)
            collection.RemoveAt(i);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Testing it here works just fine. – Jammer May 1 '13 at 15:27
    
Correction, you are right. – Jammer May 1 '13 at 15:30
    
"Testing it here works just fine" - try a few more test cases. In particular, a collection with two consecutive nulls followed by a non-null. – Joe May 1 '13 at 15:30
    
That's what I did ... thanks Joe – Jammer May 1 '13 at 15:34

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