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I am trying to do memory leak Visual C#. I used this Code :

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<float> s = new List<float>();
        while (true) {
            s.Add(10 ^ 10);
        }
    }
}

I ran this program and within 2 mins, I got OutofMemory Exception. Is this real code for memory leak? I was monitoring main memory space, and it had enough space. If this is Memory leak, then which cause this one to have even though there was space in ram? How Can I monitor this leak?

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1  
You're misconstruing memory leak and out of memory. Running out of memory can be a symptom of a memory leak, but they are not one and the same. I'd suggest reading up on both so you understand the difference. –  tnw May 1 '13 at 16:53
    
above comment is 100% true. its a way to create out of memory scenario –  LojiSmith Nov 26 '13 at 12:26
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your example is not memory leak, you will run out of memory but all of your created objectes can be accesed by the running program. Leak is when you have objectes in memory that can't be accessed. Here is a example of maybe the most common cause of leak in .NET, subscription to a static event:

internal class Program
{
    public static event EventHandler SomeStaticEvent;

    private static void Main()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            var a = new A();                

            //here a goes out of scope but won't be collected by GC because Program still holds reference to "a" by a static event subsription
        }
    }      
    public class A
    {                       
        public A()
        {
            //if you comment this line, there is no reference from Program to A and a will be GC-ed and memory allocated will be released
            Program.SomeStaticEvent+=ProgramOnSomeStaticEvent;
        }
        private void ProgramOnSomeStaticEvent(object sender, EventArgs eventArg){}
    }

}

Be careful with subscriptions to a static event, or to the event of a long living object. your program is leaking and is not that easy to spot why. Always unsubscribe from such event before object goes out of scope.

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Technically that's not a leak either. You could write some code to do: SomeStaticEvent = null thus allowing all of the A objects to be freed. –  Servy May 1 '13 at 17:59
    
Yes you could, but what if you don't to it. You could (and should) unsubscribe to aviod leak.. As i see it leak always occurs when you haven't done something that you should have done? –  jure May 1 '13 at 18:06
    
By that definition the OP's code is indeed a leak because the memory could be reclaimed if he did something. Some people choose to use that definition (especially in C#) which is okay, if they're clear on it, but using that definition your code is no different from the OP's. In C/C++ however a memory leak is termed for when you have lost all references to an object, but without reclaiming it's memory. When that happens you lose the ability to ever reclaim it. –  Servy May 1 '13 at 18:10
    
I get your point, and i agree. But C++ is different, you have to call destructors, programmer is responsible for memory deallocation. In .NET we do have GC for that. This here may not be a "true" leak, but is by my experience very common scenario of leaving "out of scope" objects in memory. I saw this "bug" in a lot of libraries, even the ones created by most experienced teams. Call it leak or not, you lost memory and can't reclaim it without some hacks that you shouldn't need to do. –  jure May 1 '13 at 18:30
    
Thanks guys for your replies. I tried code in C/C++ with pointer example and as well as I tried in C# also. No where, I found error. I was keeping eye on Memory Performance, but still that seemed OK for me. If memory Leaks means Program doesn't free up their Object space, then my program is doing same. I found that, no matter what I add, Error happens at same List Count xxxxxxxxx (9 Digit) count. –  Hakoo Desai May 2 '13 at 1:32
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This is not a memory leak. Each number you have added is still accessible from your list object. Your code is just using a lot of memory and eventually you run out.

It's possible you are hitting the maximum amount of memory for a single object.

The garbage collector will ensure that memory associated with an object is deallocated when there are no more references to the object.

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What are you expecting s.Add to do? It adds a new element onto your list each time it's executed. So the first time, you'll have a list with one element, the second time s is now a list with 2 elements, the millionth time it'll have a million elements in it. It'll keep going that way until it's too big to fit in memory.

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Yes, you right. I want to make my memory full, until I have memory leak. Actually, this is what I expect. But it is not happening. It seems, still I have memory, but .NET stop adding more elements in List. List count goes till 9 digits. –  Hakoo Desai May 2 '13 at 1:36
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