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I have function checking mandatory participation as follows:

CREATE FUNCTION member_in_has_address()
RETURNS BOOLEAN AS $$
BEGIN
RETURN EXISTS (SELECT *
       FROM address a, member_details b
       WHERE b.member_id = a.member_id);
END;
$$  LANGUAGE plpgsql;

Then called from CHECK constraint

ALTER TABLE member_details
 ADD CONSTRAINT member_in_has_address_check
  CHECK (member_in_has_address());

To create deferable constraint in Standard SQL it would be:

ALTER TABLE member_details
 ADD CONSTRAINT member_in_has_address_check
  INITIALLY DEFERRED
  CHECK (member_in_has_address()); 

How can I do the same in PostgreSQL?

share|improve this question
    
Your current member_in_has_address() will return true when any of the members has address. It wont check if a particular member has a address. –  Igor Romanchenko May 1 '13 at 18:05
    
Thank you Igor, but my main question is how to deffer such constraint until the child (address) is updated. The insert is as follows: insert into member_details which is parent and then to address which has foreigh key. member_details has mandatory participation with address. –  Radovan Luptak May 1 '13 at 18:51
    
See my answer below. The answer - create a defferred foreign key. –  Igor Romanchenko May 1 '13 at 18:53
    
Yes, you are right I've just joined the two tables. –  Radovan Luptak May 5 '13 at 18:57

3 Answers 3

You can deffer constraints in Postgresql in the same way as in other RDBMS, but for current version (9.2) you can only deffer UNIQUE, PRIMARY KEY, EXCLUDE, and REFERENCES. Extract from this page of the manual:

DEFERRABLE
NOT DEFERRABLE

This controls whether the constraint can be deferred. A constraint that is not deferrable will be checked immediately after every command. Checking of constraints that are deferrable can be postponed until the end of the transaction (using the SET CONSTRAINTS command). NOT DEFERRABLE is the default. Currently, only UNIQUE, PRIMARY KEY, EXCLUDE, and REFERENCES (foreign key) constraints accept this clause. NOT NULL and CHECK constraints are not deferrable.

INITIALLY IMMEDIATE
INITIALLY DEFERRED

If a constraint is deferrable, this clause specifies the default time to check the constraint. If the constraint is INITIALLY IMMEDIATE, it is checked after each statement. This is the default. If the constraint is INITIALLY DEFERRED, it is checked only at the end of the transaction. The constraint check time can be altered with the SET CONSTRAINTS command.

You can create a simple deferred foreign key from member_details to address instead of your current constraint to check, if every member has an address.

UPDATE: You need to create 2 foreign key. One regular one from address(member_id) to member_details(member_id). The other one - defferred from member_details(member_id) to address(member_id).

With this two foreign keys you will be able to:

  1. Create a member in member_details.
  2. Create an address in address for member from step 1
  3. Commit (with no errors)

OR

  1. Create a member in member_details.
  2. Commit (and get error from defferred foreign key).
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. So it means I can deffer a foreign key in address and then insert first to address and then to member_details. –  Radovan Luptak May 1 '13 at 18:56
    
But there is another problem, member_details has autoincremtned primary key so I first insert into member_details then retriev its primary key and then insert into address. –  Radovan Luptak May 1 '13 at 19:05
    
@RadovanLuptak Just create 2 foreign keys, one member_details(member_id) -> address(member_id), and second address(member_id) -> member_details(member_id). –  Igor Romanchenko May 1 '13 at 19:10
    
@RadovanLuptak I updated my answer with details. –  Igor Romanchenko May 1 '13 at 19:16
    
I am quite new to this can you tell me what is the benefit? I only suspect that when I enforce both foreign keys as NOT NULL I can achieve mandatory participation on both sides and by making foreign key referencing address address_id UNIQUE I can achieve 1 to n participation. –  Radovan Luptak May 1 '13 at 19:21

Wrap your queries in a transaction, and then use a deferred foreign key and deferred constraint triggers if at least one address is needed:

CREATE CONSTRAINT TRIGGER member_details_address_check_ins
  AFTER INSERT ON member_details
DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED
FOR EACH ROW
EXECUTE PROCEDURE member_details_address_check_ins();

ALTER TABLE address
ADD CONSTRAINT address_member_details_member_id_fkey
FOREIGN KEY (member_id) REFERENCES member_details(member_id)
ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE NO ACTION
DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED;

CREATE CONSTRAINT TRIGGER address_member_details_check_del
  AFTER DELETE ON address
DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED
FOR EACH ROW
EXECUTE PROCEDURE address_member_details_check_del();

-- also consider the update cases for the inevitable merge of duplicate members.

On a separate note, normalized and pretty, but putting addresses and contact details such as emails in a separate address table occasionally introduces very colorful UI/UX issues. E.g. an untrained secretary changing the company and address of all of her boss' contacts at company A when one of them switched to company B. Yeah, seen it happen for real when the UI behaved differently from Outlook...

Anyway, and fwiw, I've found that it's usually more convenient to store this stuff in the same table as the contact, i.e. address1, address2, email1, email2, etc. It makes other things simpler for a variety of other reasons -- namely running checks like the one you're looking into. The extremely rare case where you'd want to store more than two such pieces of information are, in practice, simply not worth the hassle.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I completly forgot about insert and delete trigger to enforce mandatory participation. I've done it in Sybase. –  Radovan Luptak May 2 '13 at 18:04
    
Btw, there was a related question today, where I ended up expanding on my concluding point: dba.stackexchange.com/a/41430/1860 –  Denis May 2 '13 at 18:08

This is what I come up with.

ALTER TABLE address
ADD CONSTRAINT address_member_in_has_address
FOREIGN KEY (member_id) REFERENCES member_details(member_id)
ON DELETE CASCADE
DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED;

CREATE FUNCTION member_in_has_address() RETURNS trigger AS $BODY$
    BEGIN
    IF NOT EXISTS(SELECT * 
                   FROM member_details
                   WHERE member_id IN (SELECT member_id 
                                        FROM address)) 
    THEN
            RAISE EXCEPTION 'Error: member does not have address';
        END IF;
    RETURN NEW;
    END;
$BODY$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

CREATE CONSTRAINT TRIGGER manatory_participation_member_details_ins
 AFTER INSERT ON member_details 
 DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED 
 FOR EACH ROW  
 EXECUTE PROCEDURE member_in_has_address();

CREATE CONSTRAINT TRIGGER manatory_participation_member_details_del
 AFTER INSERT ON member_details 
 DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED 
 FOR EACH ROW 
 EXECUTE PROCEDURE member_in_has_address();

I tried Igor's version using foreign keys in both tables without the triggers. In this case this constraint is not deffered.

ALTER TABLE member_details
ADD CONSTRAINT member_details_in_has_address
FOREIGN KEY (address_id) REFERENCES address
ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE CASCADE
DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED;

I get this: ERROR: null value in column "address_id" violates not-null constraint

When inserting using this annonymous block:

DO $$ 
DECLARE 
 mem BIGINT;
BEGIN
INSERT INTO member_details (member_first_name, member_last_name, member_dob, member_phone_no, 
member_email, member_gender, industry_position, account_type, music_interests)
VALUES ('Rado','Luptak','07/09/80','07540962233','truba@azet.sk','M','DJ','basic','hard core');

SELECT member_id 
 INTO mem
FROM member_details
WHERE member_first_name = 'Rado' AND member_last_name = 'Luptak'
AND member_dob = '07/09/76';

INSERT INTO address (address_id, house_name_no, post_code, street_name, town, country, member_id)
VALUES (mem, '243', 'E17 3TT','Wood Road','London', 'UK', mem);

UPDATE member_details
 SET  address_id = mem WHERE member_id = mem;
END
$$;

Another problem with enforcing mandatory participation in member_details using address_id of address table (Igor's version) is that this allows me to insert row into member_details and reference an existing address row, but the existing address row references different member_details row. When the latter member_details row is deleted it cascades and deletes the address row, which can or cannot delete (depends on settings) the new inserted member_details row. It would also return different details when joining on member_id and on address_id. Therefore, it requires another constraint, so I stayed with trigger and dropping it before insert and recreating it after insert, due to the trigger is not deferred.

share|improve this answer
    
As I said before, the function member_in_has_address() will return true when any of the members has address. It wont check if a particular member has a address. –  Igor Romanchenko May 2 '13 at 19:12
    
Yes, I agree and I updated the body of the procedure. –  Radovan Luptak May 7 '13 at 19:43

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