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I'm trying to grasp the relation between iteration and recursion by trying to model a simplified execution of a body of statements within a scope { } on an old homework assignment I had. Let's say I have two statement types: while statement, and an assignment statement.

For now, I'm assuming the while statement's condition is always true. EDIT: Also, assume the while statement only executes once (i.e, I should have called it an if statement)

In recursion, this would be simple:

executeBody( body )
{
  for each stmt in body
  {
    switch (stmt)
    {
      case ASSIGNMENT:
       // work
       break;

      case WHILE-STMT:
        executeBody(whileStmt->body)
        break;
    }
  }
}

But, I'm having trouble doing this for iteration. I know I need to simulate a stack, but I just can't conceptualize how to execute all the statements in a while statement before I go to the next statement. Here's a model of what I have:

executeBody( body )
{
  for each stmt in body
  {
    case ASSIGNMENT:
      // work
      break;

    case WHILE-STMT:
    {
       stack< body > stack;
       stack.push(whileStmt->body);     
       while (stack isNotEmpty)
       {
          for each stmt (in each body) in stack
          {
            case ASSIGNMENT:
              // work;
              break;

            case WHILE-STMT:
              //stack.push(this_whileStmt->body);
              // ????
              break;
          }
       }
    }  
  }
}

EDIT: Changed the recursion example to show that the body is a sequence of statements.

share|improve this question
    
is the iteration psudo-code you've posted the correct code or is it your own code –  Sam I am May 1 '13 at 18:25
    
Its my own code - which isn't correct, as it isn't finished –  Vance May 1 '13 at 18:25
    
I would start with while(cond) cmd, where cmd can be a statement or a block. Then you maintain a stack of cmd / cond / exec state tuples. When you hit a while, if cond, push a triple. Standard blocks push a false cond. Outer loop is to advance the exec state of uppermost on stack, get cmd, handle. If uppermost is done, check cond and pop or reset exec state. –  Yakk May 1 '13 at 18:29
    
The body is a sequence of statements. I've revised the recursion example, adding a for each and switch statement –  Vance May 1 '13 at 18:39
2  
"In recursion, this would be simple" or maybe not. You are executing the body of each while statement only once, which is not exactly right. –  n.m. May 1 '13 at 18:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First off, I'd ditch your outer loop. It's redundant.

   stack< body > stack;
   stack.push(body);     
   while (stack isNotEmpty)
   {
      for each stmt (in stack.pop()) // pop the top statement off of your stack
      {
        case ASSIGNMENT:
          // work;
          stmt.Remove()
          /*you don't need to break here.  just go onto the next operation*/

        case WHILE-STMT:
          stack.push(stmt->body);
          stmt.Remove()
          stack.push(stmt); 
          break;
      }

once you've hit the WHILE-STMT: case, the code will break and proceed with the top item of the stack, which is the code block that you've just put onto there.

once that block is finished executing, it will have been popped off the stack(you're doing this in the for declaration), and it will resume with your current block. The whole purpose of purging the current statements, and pushing the working block back onto the stack is for the purpose of being able to resume like this.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see how this properly resumes after a loop has been executed. What does stmt.Remove() do? –  phant0m May 1 '13 at 18:42
    
@phant0m Other than the fact that it treats while statements as plain code blocks(exactly like the OPs recursive example) what do you think happens when it resumes? –  Sam I am May 1 '13 at 18:44
    
@phant0m it's supposed to either remove the statement from the block. –  Sam I am May 1 '13 at 18:50
    
Depending on the actual implementation, if you don't like removing, you can mark it as executed, or keep an index. –  Sam I am May 1 '13 at 18:50
    
I see, that makes sense: +1 –  phant0m May 1 '13 at 18:51

You have the stack in the wrong place. It should be declared at the top of the executeBody routine. Check this out:

executeBody(body) {
    stack<body> work;

    stack.push(body);

    while (stack isNotEmpty) {
        item = stack.pop();
        switch (item) {
            case ASSIGNMENT:
                // work;
                break;
            case WHILE-STMT:
                stack.push(item);
                break;
        }
    }
}

This pseudo-code should make it clear that all of your bodies go on the stack. Some of them do ASSIGNMENT and some do WHILE.

share|improve this answer
1  
in WHILE_STMT it should read stack.push(item->body), otherwise it would turn into an infinite loop. –  Daniel Christiany May 1 '13 at 18:28
    
A minor change: you will need a loop to iteratively push while-stmt items to the stack.. –  Thrustmaster May 1 '13 at 18:29
    
The original second code fragment suggests that body is a sequence of statements. Your code does not do any kind of iteration on it, something's off. –  phant0m May 1 '13 at 18:35
    
Thanks for the comments - I was just trying to illustrate the concept that the stack should be for the whole routine, not just inside the case statement. I wasn't trying to drill very deep. (But I do understand the points made here.) –  No One in Particular May 2 '13 at 10:11

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