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I ran into a bit of a strange issue, if I attempt to call delete_at on a cloned Hash which happens to have an array as one of it's key-values it will also delete from the original Hash. Is there any way of getting around this?

h1 = {:stuff => [1,2,3]}
h2 = h1.clone
h2[:stuff].delete_at(0)

puts h1 #=> {:stuff=>[2, 3]}
puts h2 #=> {:stuff=>[2, 3]}
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Just for more clarification, I did this in irb and both array's had the same object_id. –  squiguy May 1 '13 at 19:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that the array referred to as h2[:stuff] is identical to h1[:stuff]. You need to dup that.

h1 = {:stuff => [1,2,3]}
h2 = h1.clone
h2.keys.each{|k| h2[k] = h2[k].dup}
h2[:stuff].delete_at(0)

Or, more directly,

h1 = {:stuff => [1,2,3]}
h2 = {}
h1.each{|k, v| h2[k] = v.dup}
h2[:stuff].delete_at(0)

Note that immutable objects cannot be duped. In such case, you need to do something like:

h1 = {:stuff => [1,2,3]}
h2 = {}
h1.each{|k, v| h2[k] = v.dup rescue v}
h2[:stuff].delete_at(0)
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1  
Is this because clone makes a shallow copy? –  squiguy May 1 '13 at 18:58
    
Yes. That is right. –  sawa May 1 '13 at 18:59
    
I'm face-palming so hard right now. Thanks! –  Noz May 1 '13 at 18:59

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