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In Oracle, I can re-create a view with a single statement, as shown here:

CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW MY_VIEW AS
SELECT SOME_FIELD
FROM SOME_TABLE
WHERE SOME_CONDITIONS

As the syntax implies, this will drop the old view and re-create it with whatever definition I've given.

Is there an equivalent in SQL Server 2005 that will do the same thing?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 42 down vote accepted

The solutions above though they will get the job done do so at the risk of dropping user permissions. I prefer to do my create or replace views or stored procedures as follows.

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.views WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'[dbo].[vw_myView]'))
    EXEC sp_executesql N'CREATE VIEW [dbo].[vw_myView] AS SELECT ''This is a code stub which will be replaced by an Alter Statement'' as [code_stub]'
GO

ALTER VIEW [dbo].[vw_myView]
AS
SELECT 'This is a code which should be replaced by the real code for your view' as [real_code]
GO
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1  
I used to be a "Drop" then (re) "Add" person. But now I lean to this type of solution (add if not there, then alter). –  granadaCoder Aug 6 '12 at 13:44
    
Alter a view is way better than drop and recreate it. What if you have a lot of existing users security setup for a view, then you would have to recreate all those. This is my approach to this issue. –  jonas Dec 4 '13 at 11:42

You can use 'IF EXISTS' to check if the view exists and drop if it does.

IF EXISTS (SELECT TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.VIEWS
        WHERE TABLE_NAME = 'MyView')
    DROP VIEW MyView
GO

CREATE VIEW MyView
AS 
     ....
GO
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3  
That's the way I do it too. Oracle's Create or replace is way better, I hate to repeat code. –  Rismo Oct 2 '08 at 17:39
4  
The problem with this is that you lose any permissions that may have existed on the object that got dropped. –  simon Sep 14 '11 at 14:39
    
Use John DaCosta's answer below, it's better. Consider wrapping in Tom's utility function. –  Mr. TA Dec 27 '11 at 16:20

I use:

IF OBJECT_ID('[dbo].[myView]') IS NOT NULL
DROP VIEW [dbo].[myView]
GO
CREATE VIEW [dbo].[myView]
AS

...

Recently I added some utility procedures for this kind of stuff:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.DropView
@ASchema VARCHAR(100),
@AView VARCHAR(100)
AS
BEGIN
  DECLARE @sql VARCHAR(1000);
  IF OBJECT_ID('[' + @ASchema + '].[' + @AView + ']') IS NOT NULL
  BEGIN
    SET @sql  = 'DROP VIEW ' + '[' + @ASchema + '].[' + @AView + '] ';
    EXEC(@sql);
  END 
END

So now I write

EXEC dbo.DropView 'mySchema', 'myView'
GO
CREATE View myView
...
GO

I think it makes my changescripts a bit more readable

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I typically use something like this:

if exists (select * from dbo.sysobjects
  where id = object_id(N'dbo.MyView') and
  OBJECTPROPERTY(id, N'IsView') = 1)
drop view dbo.MyView
go
create view dbo.MyView [...]
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This also works with stored procedures, tables, etc. –  Dave Oct 2 '08 at 16:25

You can use ALTER to update a view, but this is different than the Oracle command since it only works if the view already exists. Probably better off with DaveK's answer since that will always work.

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1  
Although ALTER keeps existing Permissions (and retains the Old Version if the new version has syntax errors etc.). So using IF NOT EXISTS ... to create a Stub, and then ALTER to replace it/original may be better in maintaining permissions and dependencies. –  Kristen Feb 24 '09 at 20:07

protected by Jeff Atwood Jun 10 '10 at 10:50

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