Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

when using connect() in a tcp client program or accept() in a tcp server program many possible exceptions may happen e.g, TCP SYN or TCP SYN/ACK is lost OR some other errors

(BTW, I'm wondering ,if TCP SYN is lots, will connect() retransmit TCP SYN or it just produces an error?)

ususally the source codes are like

if(connect()<0){
 ...
 exit(1);
}

or

if (accept()<)){
 ...
 exit(1);
}

however, if I want to try connect() or accept() again, is it possible or not? like

while(connect()<0){
       continue;
}

or

while(accept()<0){
      continue;
}

will such a dealing produce unacceptable consequences?

besides, how about send() and recv() thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Elegance has nothing to do with it. The question, what is your functional requirement? –  EJP May 1 '13 at 22:48

1 Answer 1

Generally once and accept or connect fails, they will always fail, so your while loops are just infinite loop on failure. There are some exceptions (non-blocking sockets that 'fail' with EINPROGRESS or EAGAIN), but generally when there's an error, you need to check the error code and do something appropriate, such as closing the socket and opening a new one.

share|improve this answer
    
how about the case of lost TCP SYN, will connect() function retransmit? –  misteryes May 1 '13 at 21:30
    
No. connect() failure does not mean a single SYN packet timed out. connect() failure means that all retransmissions of that packet failed. You don't need to write any code to make the platform TCP stack simply do its job. –  Glyph May 1 '13 at 21:39
    
then how about send() recv(), fork()failure? if they failed, it means I need to close this socket or quit the program? –  misteryes May 2 '13 at 12:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.