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I've been doing Objective-C programming for a few years now. I was listening to a podcast the other day which mentioned something about how Apple has made it easier over the years, and I thought I heard mention of there being no need to manually add instance variables now. Is this true? Here's how I do it currently:

.h:

@interface Class : UIView

@property (nonatomic, strong) NSString *testString;

@end

.m:

@interface Class () {

NSString *_testString;

}

@end

@implementation Class

@synthesize testString = _testString;

Is this work necessary?

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Only what you have written in header file is all that you need now. Everthing in m file is not needed. –  Anupdas May 1 '13 at 19:13
    
Just out of curiosity, which podcast? Looking for some new listening :) –  rog May 1 '13 at 19:18
1  
@rog Debug podcast. –  Andrew May 1 '13 at 19:51
3  
Nobody knows. It varies by the hour. –  Hot Licks May 1 '13 at 20:36
    
What happened, when you tried it out? –  vikingosegundo May 3 '13 at 19:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

This is all you need now

.h:

@interface Class : UIView

@property (nonatomic, strong) NSString *testString;

@end

.m:

@implementation Class

@end
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3  
Just to note, that the implicit is: @synthesize testString = _testString; which creates _testString ivar. In case you want different name or no ivar at all, use explicit. –  iMartin May 1 '13 at 19:55
    
If you write the getter AND setter in .m for testString you have to use @synthesize. However, you do not have to write if you write the getter OR setter OR neither. –  Ríomhaire May 1 '13 at 22:07
    
@Ríomhaire: if you write getter and setter in .m, you do not have to use @synthesize –  newacct May 2 '13 at 4:17
1  
@newacct You're thoughts on this stackoverflow.com/questions/12918388/… ? –  Ríomhaire May 2 '13 at 10:38
    
@Ríomhaire: You still don't need to use @synthesize, all it is doing in that case is creating the ivar for you, which you can do yourself. –  dreamlax May 2 '13 at 15:29

Nope, it will auto-synthesize in Xcode 4.4+

You can read more about it here.

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@property will automatically create an instance variable now, and @synthesize is automatically added unless you specify otherwise. So yes, just a @property is enough.

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All of that work is unnecessary.

Just declare the property, it will automatically default to creating an instance variable with the underscore convention. Though, self.property may tickle your fancy as well.

You can do the same for private properties by declaring them in an interface extension in the .m file.

@synthesize-ing is no longer necessary. @dynamic is still necessary if I understand correctly

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1  
@synthesize is not gone –  newacct May 2 '13 at 4:19
    
correct, I've rephrased my answer –  atreat May 2 '13 at 13:39

Although you don't need to type that boilerplate code for non-@dynamic properties since LLVM 4.0 (Xcode 4.4+), it's a good thing to know that it is a compiler feature, not part of the language (Objective C), nor the runtime system. The runtime system still rely on instance variables and getters/setters generated by the @synthesize directive. It's the compiler who is able to generate the code for you, pretty much like it is able to follow conventions and generate calls to retain and release in ARC code.

So, it is important to notice that, if you are going to share your project with other developers using older versions of Xcode (specifically, older versions of the Clang/LLVM compiler), you must synthesize your variables or the project will not compile in their machines or will fail at runtime.

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