Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It seems that if a given thread fails for any reason, this will cause an infinite loop.

This is code that isn't written by me so I can't even edit it, but I think the most obvious problem here is that the counter variable totalActions isn't marked as volatile, and as a result the threads are not seeing the most up-to-date value.

So it looks like if it never gets the real value of totalActions, it will keep waiting?

Will this cause the thread to run recursively then? While debugging, I notice that the executing thread fails (exception is thrown), and it just keeps getting called over and over and over....

public void PerformActions(List<Action> actions)
{
   object actionLock = new object();
   int totalActions = actionts.Count;

   for(int x = 0; x < accounts.Count; x++)
   {
      int y = x;
      new Thread(delegate()
      {
        actions[y].Invoke();

        if(Interlocked.Decrement(ref totalActions) == 0)
        {
            lock(actionLock)
            {
                Monitor.Pulse(actionLock);
            }
        }
    }).Start();
   }

   lock(actionLock)
   {
        if(totalActions > 0)
        {
           Monitor.Wait(actionLock);
        }    
   }
}

Update

Usage is like this, where the myService is making httpRequest calls to grab json requests from an API service.

Execute.InParallel(
new Action[]
    {
    () => { abc = myService.DoSomething(); },
    () => { def = myService.DoSomethingElse(); }
    });
share|improve this question
1  
This code has nothing to do with the TPL (other than the fact that using the TPL would have prevented this incorrect code from being written in the first place.) –  dlev May 1 '13 at 19:53
    
Well according to MSDN docs the use of volatile should be kept to a minimum if used at all. And is mostly there for embeded systems that have very limited memory. They suggest using the lock keyword or another one of the locking mechanisms like mutexes and semaphores. Also the use of Interlocked.Decrement() prevents that issue in the first place. because that is an atomic action, meaning only one thread can work on it at a time. –  Nomad101 May 1 '13 at 19:53
    
@Nomad101 I know in java, you have to mark the variable in order to guarantee other threads see the value, otherwise local thread copy will be used and that may not be the correct value. –  loyalflow May 1 '13 at 19:57
    
@user1361315 within C# that is not true. A variable can be seen by any thread that has the inheritance/Permissions to see it. –  Nomad101 May 1 '13 at 20:01
    
@dlev can you comment on what you find is incorrect? –  loyalflow May 1 '13 at 20:37

2 Answers 2

The lock will act as a memory barrier, ensuring that your test if(totalActions > 0) reads the current value. I'm not convinced that this code is race-free but the race would at least be very, very unlikely. You'd have a hard time reproducing it.

So the problem is something else not shown here. Can you use the debugger to find out what exactly the threads involved are doing?

You say some threads die due to an unhandled exception. Maybe the threads exiting early causes the count not to decrement.

Also, if you can't change the code, what is the point of the question? I'm not sure what to suggest to you.

share|improve this answer
    
usr, thanaks, I gave an example usage, it is these myService calls make api calls and if the endpoint is down, when in debug mode, it just keeps making the same call over and over again i.e. DoSomething() –  loyalflow May 1 '13 at 20:01
    
I updated the code. While debugging, I noticed that once my breakpoint hits the Monitor.Wait line, it never actually even reaches the if statement where it decrements. Is that the cause of the infinite loop? NOt sure why it would keeping trying to make the httprequest when it is failing... –  loyalflow May 1 '13 at 20:22

The loop is incorrect - in that variable x is captured incorrectly. it will always have the last value of x when actions[x].Invoke(); is executed in each thread. So, the last delegate passed to array will be called multiple times.

Correct way to do it is like this

    for(int x = 0; x < accounts.Count; x++)
       {
          int y = x; // here correct value of y will be captured in delegate
          new Thread(delegate()
          {
            actions[y].Invoke();
   ...
share|improve this answer
    
sorry the actual code had that, I somehow missed that line sorry! –  loyalflow May 1 '13 at 20:54
    
OK then best you can do is change the if condition to if(Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref totalActions, 0, 0) > 0) –  YK1 May 1 '13 at 21:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.