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I'm trying to count the number of records that have a null DateTime value. However, for some reason, my attempts have failed. I have tried the following two queries without any luck:

SELECT COUNT(BirthDate) 
  FROM Person p
 WHERE p.BirthDate IS NULL

and

SELECT COUNT(BirthDate)
  FROM Person p
 WHERE p.BirthDate = NULL

What am I doing wrong? I can see records with a BirthDate of NULL when I query all of the records.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted
SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM Person
WHERE BirthDate IS NULL
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All answers are correct, but I'll explain why...

COUNT(column) ignores NULLs, COUNT(*) includes NULLs.

So this works...

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM Person
WHERE BirthDate IS NULL
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try this

SELECT     COUNT(*) 
FROM     Person p
WHERE     p.BirthDate IS NULL
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This is happening because you are trying to do a COUNT on NULL. I think that if you check the messages tab, you may have a message there saying NULL values eliminated from aggregate

What you have to change is the field that you are counting

Select Count (1) FROM Person WHERE BirthDate IS NULL

Select Count (*) FROM Person WHERE BirthDate IS NULL

Select Count (1/0) FROM Person WHERE BirthDate IS NULL

Select Count ('duh') FROM Person WHERE BirthDate IS NULL /* some non null string*/

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Good point with 1/0. Does it work though? ;-) In EXISTS, yes, but I've not tried it like this (and can't just now) –  gbn Oct 27 '09 at 18:15
    
it sure works.. –  Raj More Oct 27 '09 at 18:39
    
Tried it. It works. Weird. –  Rob Garrison Oct 27 '09 at 19:51

You need to use "IS NULL" not "= NULL"

SELECT
  COUNT('')
FROM
  Person p
WHERE
  BirthDate IS NULL
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why empty string? –  Fredou Oct 27 '09 at 18:04
    
Using the empty string is less load on the DB because it doesn't retrieve any data, just an empty string. –  MattB Oct 27 '09 at 18:06
3  
But my understanding is that COUNT(*) doesn't load anything either. It just does a base count. At least in modern SQL Server instances. –  Orion Adrian Oct 27 '09 at 18:10
    
@MattB: empty string, literal 1 or * all do the same thing. However, the reason you give is not valid. –  gbn Oct 27 '09 at 18:12

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