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I'm new to Node.js and I am writing a client to consume a text-based TCP stream from a server. For testing purposes, I want to simulate the server in Node so I can test with no other dependencies.

I have a file of captured data that looks like:

$X,... <-- broadcast every second 
$A,...
$A,...
$B,...
$X,... <-- broadcast every second 
$A,...
$A,...
$C,...
$X,...  <-- broadcast every second 

The server emits a line starting with $X every second. The other records are broadcast as events happen. How can I modify my network server below to broadcast this data and throttle it so it emits one line at a time and pauses for one second every time it encounters a line starting with $X?

Here is my code so far which reads in the data and broadcasts it over a port:

 var http = require('http')
 , fs = require('fs')
;
var server = http.createServer(function (req, res) {
 var stream = fs.createReadStream(__dirname + '/data.txt');
 stream.pipe(res);
});
server.listen(8000);
console.log('server running on 8000');

This works but obviously just streams out the whole file at warp speed. What I want is to spit out all of the lines from one $X to the next, pause for one second (close enough for testing purposes) and then continue to the next $X and so on like:

> telnet 127.0.0.1 8000
$X,... 
$A,...
$A,...
$B,...

(output would pause for one second)

$X,...
$A,...
$A,...
$C,...

(output would pause for one second)

$X,...
...

In my example above, the broadcast always starts from the beginning of data.txt when I connect with a client. Ideally, this server would keep broadcasting this data in a loop, allowing clients to disconnect and reconnect at any time and start receiving data wherever the server simulator was currently at.

(PS - data.txt is a relatively small file, < 1MB in most cases)

UPDATE -

Thanks to Laurent's pointer, I was able to get it working with the following:

var net = require('net'),
     fs = require('fs'),
     async = require('async');

var server = net.createServer(function (socket) {
  var lines = fs.readFileSync(__dirname + '/data-small.txt').toString().split(/\n+/);

  async.whilst(
    function () {
      return lines.length > 0;
    },
    function (done) {
        var line = lines.shift();
        socket.write(line + '\r\n');
        setTimeout(done, /^\$X,/.test(line) ? 1000 : 0);
      },
    function (err) {
      // no more lines present
      socket.end();
    });
});

server.listen(8000);
console.log('server running on 8000');

I'm now getting a blast of lines until an $X, a 1s pause, and then it continues! Thanks!

Drilling into my 2nd part: is there a way to synchronize output of this faux server so all clients see the same output regardless of when they connect?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you want to keep all clients in sync, you need to do something entirely different. Here's a starting point. Also, it seems like the net module would be a better fit.

var net = require('net'),
    fs = require('fs'),
    _ = require('underscore');

var current = 0,
    sockets = [];

// dirty parser for blocs
var data = fs.readFileSync(__dirname + '/data.txt').toString(),
    blocs = _.chain(data.split(/\$X,/)).compact().map(function (bloc) {
      return '$X,' + bloc;
    }).value();

function streamBloc() {
  console.log('writing bloc #' + current + ' to ' + sockets.length + ' sockets');
  _(sockets).each(function (socket) {
    socket.write(blocs[current]);
  });

  current = (current + 1) % blocs.length;
  setTimeout(streamBloc, 1000);
}

var server = net.createServer(function (socket) {
  console.log('incoming connection');

  // immediately write current bloc
  socket.write(blocs[current]);

  // add to sockets so that it receive future blocs
  sockets.push(socket);

  // cleanup when the client leaves
  socket.on('end', function () {
    sockets = _(sockets).without(socket);
  });
}).listen(8000, function () {
  console.log('server listening on port 8000');
});

streamBloc();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Laurent! It almost works but when I connect, it emits the entire file contents and errors out with "has no method 'split' at Server.<anonymous> (C:\Users\brian\Documents\workspace\node-test\rmonitor.js:125:56) at Server.EventEmitter.emit (events.js:98:17) at HTTPParser.parser.onIncoming (http.js:2027:12) at HTTPParser.parserOnHeadersComplete [as onHeadersComplete] (http.js:119:23) at Socket.socket.ondata (http.js:1917:22) at TCP.onread (net.js:510:27)" –  Brian G May 1 '13 at 23:30
    
I think it's quite simple: readFileSync returns a buffer that first needs to be converted with .toString(). Can you try again with the updated code ? –  Laurent Perrin May 2 '13 at 13:58
    
I've just read your updated answer ;) –  Laurent Perrin May 2 '13 at 13:59

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