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I am trying to create a new multi-dimensional array of a certain length (5, for testing), fill it with values and then pass that array to a subroutine that runs in a thread separate from the main code so that the main code can continue to create a new array for next values to be filled. This cycle has to continue endlessly.

I see the array is passed and I can see values for $set[0], but it seems like the array gets overwritten or something. I'm not sure of what is going on here. And the hypertable connection object is not passed properly: I had to create a new connection object in each thread. What am I missing here?

#!/usr/bin/perl -w -I /opt/hypertable/0.9.7.3/lib/perl -I /opt/hypertable/0.9.7.3/lib/perl/gen-perl
use strict;
use IO::Socket;
use Geo::IP;
use threads qw(stringify);
use Net::NBName;
use Data::Dumper;
use Hypertable::ThriftClient;

my $hypertable = new Hypertable::ThriftClient("Server", 38080);
my $namespace  = $hypertable->namespace_open("TEST");
my $MAXLEN     = 1524;
my $buf        = '';

my $limit = 5;    #length of array
my $sock  = IO::Socket::INET->new(LocalPort => '514', Proto => 'udp') || die("Socket: $@");

do {
    my $count = 0;
    my @set;

    for ($count = 0; $count <= $limit; $count++) {
        $sock->recv($buf, $MAXLEN);
        my ($port, $ipaddr) = sockaddr_in($sock->peername);
        my $hn = gethostbyaddr($ipaddr, AF_INET);
        $buf =~ /<(\d+)>(.*?):(.*)/;
        my $msg = $3;
        $set[$count][0] = $hn;
        $set[$count][1] = $msg;
        print $count. " --> "
            . $set[$count][0] . " --> "
            . $set[$count][1]
            . "\n";    #Multi dimensional array

    }

    my $thr = threads->create('logsys', @set, $hypertable);

} while (1);


sub logsys {

    my $count = 0;

    for ($count = 0; $count <= $limit; $count++) {
        my $hypertable = shift; # Here I want to use the single NoSQL db connector object for all threads
        my @set = shift;

        print $count. " --> "
            . @set->[$count][0] . " --> "
            . @set->[$count][1]
            . "\n";    # Here I expect the same exact array elements

        #DO SOME MORE STUFF here
    }
}

EDIT: A simple code either to be run in a thread or without thread. When run in a thread the processing doesn't process all the elements in the array. But when run without threading then it processes all the elements.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w -I /opt/hypertable/0.9.7.3/lib/perl -I /opt/hypertable/0.9.7.3/lib/perl/gen-perl
use strict;
use IO::Socket;
use Geo::IP;
use threads qw(stringify);
use Net::NBName;
use Data::Dumper;
use Hypertable::ThriftClient;

# Syslog Variables and Constants
my $MAXLEN = 1524;
my $limit = 5; #for testing
my $sock;
# Start Listening on UDP port 514
$sock = IO::Socket::INET->new(LocalPort => '514', Proto => 'udp') || die("Socket: $@");

my $buf = '';
  my $count = 0;
  my @set;

  for ($count = 0; $count <= $limit; $count++) {
  $sock->recv($buf, $MAXLEN);
  my ($port, $ipaddr) = sockaddr_in($sock->peername);
  my $hn = gethostbyaddr($ipaddr, AF_INET);
  $buf=~/<(\d+)>(.*?):(.*)/;
  my $msg=$3;
  $set[$count][0] = $hn;
  $set[$count][1] = $msg;
print $count." --> ".$set[$count][0]." --> ".$set[$count][1]."\n";#Print original array, should print 5 elements 

  my $thr = threads->create('logsys',@set);

#&logsys(@set);

sub logsys {
my $count = 0;
my @set= @_;

print "--------------------- ".scalar (@set)." -------------------\n";

for ($count=0; $count <= $limit; $count++) {
print $count." --> ".$set[$count][0]." --> ".$set[$count][1]."\n";#print passed array, should same exact 5 elements
if (open(WW,">syslog")){print WW $count." --> ".$set[$count][0]." --> ".$set[$count][1]."\n"; close(WW);}

}
}

O/P when run as a thread:

0 --> ids-01p --> 23:48 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][138:4:1] sensitive_data: sensitive data - U.S. social security numbers without dashes [Classification: Sensitive Data] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.10.97.42:3065 -> 33.87.66.38:80
1 --> ids-01p --> 23:50 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][138:4:1] sensitive_data: sensitive data - U.S. social security numbers without dashes [Classification: Sensitive Data] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.10.1.254:26616 -> 78.67.61.202:80
2 --> ids-01p --> 23:50 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][138:4:1] sensitive_data: sensitive data - U.S. social security numbers without dashes [Classification: Sensitive Data] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.10.1.254:39180 -> 56.164.27.51:80
3 --> ids-01p --> 23:51 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][138:4:1] sensitive_data: sensitive data - U.S. social security numbers without dashes [Classification: Sensitive Data] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.10.52.97:53967 -> 173.194.37.97:80
4 --> ids-01p --> 23:51 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][119:15:1] http_inspect: OVERSIZE REQUEST-URI DIRECTORY [Classification: Potentially Bad Traffic] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.190.1.254:57265 -> 34.44.17.21:80
5 --> ids-01p --> 23:51 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][119:15:1] http_inspect: OVERSIZE REQUEST-URI DIRECTORY [Classification: Potentially Bad Traffic] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.190.1.254:41960 -> 34.44.17.29:80
--------------------- 6 -------------------
0 --> ids-01p --> 23:48 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][138:4:1] sensitive_data: sensitive data - U.S. social security numbers without dashes [Classification: Sensitive Data] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.190.97.42:3065 -> 43.87.66.38:80
Perl exited with active threads:
        1 running and unjoined
        0 finished and unjoined
        0 running and detached
1 --> ids-01p --> 23:50 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][138:4:1] sensitive_data: sensitive data - U.S. social security numbers without dashes [Classification: Sensitive Data] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.190.1.254:26616 -> 43.67.61.202:80

O/P when as run without a thread:

0 --> ids-01p --> 36:48 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][138:4:1] sensitive_data: sensitive data - U.S. social security numbers without dashes [Classification: Sensitive Data] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.10.1.254:34053 -> 69.164.26.77:80
1 --> ids-01p --> 36:50 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][138:4:1] sensitive_data: sensitive data - U.S. social security numbers without dashes [Classification: Sensitive Data] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.1.65.51:57977 -> 216.137.41.5:80
2 --> ids-01p --> 36:53 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][128:4:1] ssh: Protocol mismatch [Classification: Detection of a Non-Standard Protocol or Event] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.10.241.46:11120 -> 10.10.125.227:22
3 --> ids-01p --> 36:54 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][128:4:1] ssh: Protocol mismatch [Classification: Detection of a Non-Standard Protocol or Event] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.10.241.46:11122 -> 10.1.125.225:22
4 --> ids-01p --> 36:54 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][138:4:1] sensitive_data: sensitive data - U.S. social security numbers without dashes [Classification: Sensitive Data] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.1.118.96:61686 -> 50.19.254.195:80
5 --> ids-01p --> 36:54 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][138:4:1] sensitive_data: sensitive data - U.S. social security numbers without dashes [Classification: Sensitive Data] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.1.1.254:29437 -> 184.73.178.248:80
--------------------- 7 -------------------
0 --> ids-01p --> 36:48 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][138:4:1] sensitive_data: sensitive data - U.S. social security numbers without dashes [Classification: Sensitive Data] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.10.1.254:34053 -> 69.164.26.77:80
1 --> ids-01p --> 36:50 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][138:4:1] sensitive_data: sensitive data - U.S. social security numbers without dashes [Classification: Sensitive Data] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.1.65.51:57977 -> 216.137.41.5:80
2 --> ids-01p --> 36:53 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][128:4:1] ssh: Protocol mismatch [Classification: Detection of a Non-Standard Protocol or Event] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.10.241.46:11120 -> 10.10.125.227:22
3 --> ids-01p --> 36:54 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][128:4:1] ssh: Protocol mismatch [Classification: Detection of a Non-Standard Protocol or Event] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.10.241.46:11122 -> 10.1.125.225:22
4 --> ids-01p --> 36:54 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][138:4:1] sensitive_data: sensitive data - U.S. social security numbers without dashes [Classification: Sensitive Data] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.1.118.96:61686 -> 50.19.254.195:80
5 --> ids-01p --> 36:54 IDS01 SFIMS: [FLIDS][Enterprise][138:4:1] sensitive_data: sensitive data - U.S. social security numbers without dashes [Classification: Sensitive Data] [Priority: 2] {TCP} 10.1.1.254:29437 -> 184.73.178.248:80
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2 Answers 2

For one thing, you are calling the thread constructor with arguments (..., @set, $hypertable) but in the thread you are using shift to assign a value to $hypertable before you assign @set. You will either want to change the order of the arguments, as in

threads->create('logsys',$hypertable,@set);

or use pop to remove the argument from the end of @_ instead of shift (which removes it from the beginning):

my $hypertable = pop;   # same as  pop(@_)

Second, an assignment like @set = shift is almost always wrong. It is unusual to assign the return value of shift, which is a single scalar value, to a list. Once you have assigned $hypertable in the thread and removed its value from @_, all that remains in @_ is the @set you provided, so you can just say

my @set = @_;

@set->[...] is also not meaningful in Perl. To access an element of the 2d-array @set in the thread, you can use the same notation you used to create the array:

print $count." --> ".$set[$count][0]." --> ".$set[$count][1]."\n";
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I tried these but I am running into different issues now, the thread is being inconsistent. Just for testing I passed only the array and still the thread doesn't receive all the values in the array. –  Kapish M May 2 '13 at 20:42
    
When I don't run the sub in a subroutine then it will receive all the elements in the array, but when I run it as a thread then it doesn't receive all elements. –  Kapish M May 2 '13 at 21:23
    
edited my question with new details. –  Kapish M May 2 '13 at 21:45
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People complain that threads are slow, but that's only when they're used improperly, such as when spawning lots of threads instead of using worker threads.

Here's how you can address this problem in your code:

use threads;
use Thread::Queue::Any 1.03 qw( );

sub logsys {                      # Gets a reference, so uses
   my ($hypertable, $set) = @_;   #    @$set and $set->[...]  
   ... $set->[...][...] ...       # instead of
}                                 #    @set and $set[...]

my $db_queue = Thread::Queue::Any->new();

my $db_thread = async { 
   my $hypertable = ...;    # Only executed once.
   while (my $set = $db_queue->dequeue()) {
      logsys($hypertable, $set);
   }
};

... $db_queue->enqueue(\@set); ...

$db_queue->enqueue(undef);  # Signal that we're done.
$db_thread->join();         # Wait for db to be done.

By having only one DB thread, it also solves your impossible desire to have a single DB connection for all threads.

share|improve this answer
    
see my comments above. –  Kapish M May 2 '13 at 21:23
    
edited my question with new details. –  Kapish M May 2 '13 at 21:44
    
I already gave you my advice. If you don't wish to take it, that's fine, but don't come around telling me you're still having problems with your original way of doing things. –  ikegami May 2 '13 at 22:02
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