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Well, I have a class that its constructor checks whether a file exists. If the file does not exist I throw a new exception.

The problem is that when the exception is thrown, the user can see all my code ...

No way, the exception is detected from where the user instantiated class?

for example

the launch of the exception is happening here, this way, the programmer can see it all in class

if (!File.Exists(FileLocation))
        {
            throw new TFDException("File not found in the provided directory.");
        }

but would like to happen here,that's where I instantiate the class

TFDConnection con = new TFDConnection("D:\\File.tfd");
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Why don't you wrap your ctor call in a try-catch block? –  flq May 1 '13 at 21:17
    
I think you want to look at the StackTrace of the exception. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  cheedep May 1 '13 at 21:27
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/2973343/… –  YK1 May 1 '13 at 21:36
    
Well, the DLL will be used by programmers. My case is the programmer who is using the DLL does not open a try .. catch when instantiating the class? (Purposely or not). Is that where I am making this library, should have full security of the business rule .. until paid obfuscator code we've got (even if not totally prevent, rather more difficult). In my head, it is possible, therefore, in classes and structures as SqlConnection, FileInfo, and etc ... is treated that way, the treatments that we do eventually also have to give the same result is not? The case is. How to get this result. –  Thiago Borges May 1 '13 at 21:55

2 Answers 2

You can do this

try
{
    TFDConnection con = new TFDConnection("D:\\File.tfd");
}
catch(Exception exx)
{
}

to catch exception

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Well, the DLL will be used by programmers. My case is the programmer who is using the DLL does not open a try .. catch when instantiating the class? (Purposely or not). Is that where I am making this library, should have full security of the business rule .. until paid obfuscator code we've got (even if not totally prevent, rather more difficult). In my head, it is possible, therefore, in classes and structures as SqlConnection, FileInfo, and etc ... is treated that way, the treatments that we do eventually also have to give the same result is not? The case is. How to get this result. kkkk –  Thiago Borges May 1 '13 at 21:51

If source code won't be available for other programmers at the same location, which is defined in pdb files, they won't see actual source code in exception. But in general if other programmer will really want to find what's going on, nothing will help even obfuscators, they only will make it little harder... But there is another thing - why you are throwing exception in constructor? It's not very good practice, because it could leave some resources in unkown state... Better is to avoid such things

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That's exactly what I do. System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection con = new System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection("kkkkk"); con.Open(); Notice that I did not open a try .. catch, and when the exception was thrown, she went inside the library SqlConnection ... she just gave error which was instantiated. You can do this in my libraries? –  Thiago Borges May 3 '13 at 1:07

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