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def fvals_sqrt(x):
   """
   Return f(x) and f'(x) for applying Newton to find a square root.
   """
   f = x**2 - 4.
   fp = 2.*x
   return f, fp

def solve(fvals_sqrt, x0, debug_solve=True):
   """
   Solves the sqrt function, using newtons methon.
   """
   fvals_sqrt(x0)
   x0 = x0 + (f/fp)
   print x0

When I try to call the function solve, python returns:

NameError: global name 'f' is not defined

Obviously this is a scope issue, but how can I use f within my solve function?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You want this:

def solve(fvals_sqrt, x0, debug_solve=True):
    """
    Solves the sqrt function, using newtons methon.
    """
    f, fp = fvals_sqrt(x0) # Get the return values from fvals_sqrt
    x0 = x0 + (f/fp)
    print x0
share|improve this answer

You're calling fvals_sqrt() but don't do anything with the return values, so they are discarded. Returning variables won't magically make them exist inside the calling function. Your call should be like so:

f, fp = fvals_sqrt(x0)

Of course, you don't need to use the same names for the variables as are used in the return statement of the function you're calling.

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Problem is that you're not storing the returned value from the function call anywhere:

f,fp = fvals_sqrt(x0)
share|improve this answer

You need to unfold result of fvals_sqrt(x0), with this line

f, fp = fvals_sqrt(x0)

Globally, you should try

def fvals_sqrt(x):
   """
   Return f(x) and f'(x) for applying Newton to find a square root.
   """
   f = x**2 - 4.
   fp = 2.*x
   return f, fp

def solve(x0, debug_solve=True):
   """
   Solves the sqrt function, using newtons methon.
   """
   f, fp = fvals_sqrt(x0)
   x0 = x0 + (f/fp)
   print x0

solve(3)

Result

>>> 
3.83333333333
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