Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

We ran the attached test. The results consistently show that access via Array by index is 10x faster than access via Map by key. This order of magnitude difference surprised us.

Our key for the Map is java.lang.String ... is the cost of computing the Map key's java.lang.String.hashcode() implementation the exclusive reason? in the attached code, I exercised using only one key

java.lang.String key = 1; 

Doesn't the compiler/runtime cache in this case? Or does it recompute on every invoke?

Thanks for any insights.

public class PerfTest {
static java.util.HashMap<String, Double> map;
static Double[] array = {1.0,2.0,3.0,4.0,5.0,6.0,7.0,8.0,9.0,10.0};

static long nTimes = 1000000;

static{
    map = new java.util.HashMap<String, Double>();
    map.put("1",    new Double(1));
    map.put("2",    new Double(2));
    map.put("3",    new Double(3));
    map.put("4",    new Double(4));
    map.put("5",    new Double(5));
    map.put("6",    new Double(6));
    map.put("7",    new Double(7));
    map.put("8",    new Double(8));
    map.put("9",    new Double(9));
    map.put("10",   new Double(10));        
}

public static void main(String[] args){

    PerfTest tester = new PerfTest();
    long timeInMap  = tester.testHashMap();
    long timeInArray    = tester.testArray();

    System.out.println("Corrected time elapsed in map(in seconds): "        
            + (timeInMap)/1000000000.0);
    System.out.println("Corrected time elapsed in array(in seconds): " 
            + (timeInArray)/1000000000.0);
}

private long testHashMap(){
    int sz = map.size();
    long startTime = System.nanoTime();

    String key = "1";   

    for (int i=0; i <nTimes; i++){
        double sum = 0; 

        for (int j =1; j<=sz; j++){
            sum += map.get(key);                            
        }
    }
    return (System.nanoTime() - startTime);
}

private long testArray(){
    long startTime = System.nanoTime();

    for (int i=0; i <nTimes; i++){
        double sum = 0;

        for (int j=0; j< array.length; j++) {       
            sum += array[j];
        }
    }   
    return (System.nanoTime() - startTime);
   }
 }
share|improve this question
1  
Which VM did you use (vendor, version)? – mikołak May 1 '13 at 21:49
    
Why would you possibly be surprised that a direct array lookup is notably slower than a hash table query? – Louis Wasserman May 2 '13 at 6:25
    
we used Oracle's 1.7 on windows 7 (64 bit) – LRI CS May 2 '13 at 9:06
    
@Louis not surprised in the general sense, but surprised in this specific case because we thought the compiler/runtime would recognize the key never changed and might not recompute every map.get(key) invoke per iteration. P.S. not to pick, but you clearly meant to write "notably faster" :-) – LRI CS May 2 '13 at 9:38
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Using Java's system time is not a good way to get a real benchmark. I refactored your code to use Google Caliper (which warms up the JVM, among other things)... and discovered similar results to you. Commenters correctly pointed out my original version was not good and that most of the time was going to System.out.println calls.

Like I said, writing a benchmark is hard. Updated below is the new, correct version.

Results:

 0% Scenario{vm=java, trial=0, benchmark=HashMap} 51.04 ns; σ=0.22 ns @ 3 trials
50% Scenario{vm=java, trial=0, benchmark=Array} 4.05 ns; σ=0.01 ns @ 3 trials

benchmark    ns linear runtime
  HashMap 51.04 ==============================
    Array  4.05 ==

Code:

import com.google.caliper.Runner;
import com.google.caliper.SimpleBenchmark;

public class PerfTest {
    public static double hashNum = 0;
    public static double arrayNum = 0;

    public static class PerfBenchmark extends SimpleBenchmark {
        static java.util.HashMap<String, Double> map;
        static Double[] array = {1.0,2.0,3.0,4.0,5.0,6.0,7.0,8.0,9.0,10.0};

        static{
            map = new java.util.HashMap<String, Double>();
            map.put("1",    new Double(1));
            map.put("2",    new Double(2));
            map.put("3",    new Double(3));
            map.put("4",    new Double(4));
            map.put("5",    new Double(5));
            map.put("6",    new Double(6));
            map.put("7",    new Double(7));
            map.put("8",    new Double(8));
            map.put("9",    new Double(9));
            map.put("10",   new Double(10));        
        }

        public void timeHashMap(int nTimes){
            int sz = map.size();

            String key = "1";   

            for (int i=0; i <nTimes; i++){
                double sum = 0; 

                for (int j =1; j<=sz; j++){
                    sum += map.get(key);                            
                }

                hashNum += sum;
            }
        }

        public void timeArray(int nTimes){
            for (int i=0; i <nTimes; i++){
                double sum = 0;

                for (int j=0; j< array.length; j++) {       
                    sum += array[j];
                }

                arrayNum += sum;
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        Runner.main(PerfBenchmark.class, new String[0]);

        System.out.println(hashNum);
        System.out.println(arrayNum);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Aren't you benchmarking printing to System.out with that code? – meriton May 1 '13 at 22:01
    
@meriton: Both versions do the same math and do the same print. You have to do something with the sum or the JVM realizes (it's pretty smart) the summing doesn't actually do anything and then doesn't perform it at all – durron597 May 1 '13 at 22:02
    
Wouldn't a println per benchmark (rather than a println per iteration) be sufficient for that? – meriton May 1 '13 at 22:06
    
@meriton good point, except the variable goes out of scope and I wanted to change the original code as little as possible – durron597 May 1 '13 at 22:07
    
I really don't believe this test. I seriously doubt the underlying operations for hash map element access and array element access have the same performance characteristics. Could you try adding sum to a static variable each iteration, rather than calling System.out.println(...). I think the println is swamping the results here, i.e. you are trying to measure the difference in maybe 1% of total runtime. – msandiford May 1 '13 at 22:42

I can reproduce your results, and explain them.

Reproduction

public abstract class Benchmark {

    final String name;

    public Benchmark(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    abstract int run(int iterations) throws Throwable;

    private BigDecimal time() {
        try {
            int nextI = 1;
            int i;
            long duration;
            do {
                i = nextI;
                long start = System.nanoTime();
                run(i);
                duration = System.nanoTime() - start;
                nextI = (i << 1) | 1;
            } while (duration < 100000000 && nextI > 0);
            return new BigDecimal((duration) * 1000 / i).movePointLeft(3);
        } catch (Throwable e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return name + "\t" + time() + " ns";
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Benchmark[] benchmarks = {
            new Benchmark("array lookup") {
                Double[] array = { 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, 9.0, 10.0 };

                @Override
                int run(int iterations) throws Throwable {
                    double sum = 0;
                    for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {

                        for (int j = 0; j < array.length; j++) {
                            sum += array[j];
                        }
                    }
                    return (int) sum;
                }
            }, new Benchmark("map lookup") {
                Map<String, Double> map = new HashMap<>();
                {
                    map.put("1",    new Double(1));
                    map.put("2",    new Double(2));
                    map.put("3",    new Double(3));
                    map.put("4",    new Double(4));
                    map.put("5",    new Double(5));
                    map.put("6",    new Double(6));
                    map.put("7",    new Double(7));
                    map.put("8",    new Double(8));
                    map.put("9",    new Double(9));
                    map.put("10",   new Double(10));   
                }
                @Override int run(int iterations) throws Throwable {
                    String key = "1";   
                    double sum = 0; 
                    for (int i=0; i <iterations; i++){
                        for (int j =1; j<=map.size(); j++){
                            sum += map.get(key);
                        }
                    }                   
                    return (int) sum;
                }

            }
        };
        for (Benchmark bm : benchmarks) {
            System.out.println(bm);
        }
    }
}

On my somewhat dated notebook while JDK 1.7 is -server mode, this prints:

array lookup   15.250 ns
map lookup    124.946 ns

Why do I get different results than durron597, you ask? As I pointed out in the comments, he is printing to System.out for every iteration. If this actually does I/O, it's far more expensive than a map lookup. You can see test this by changing the benchmark to:

            }, new Benchmark("array lookup with printing") {
                Double[] array = { 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, 9.0, 10.0 };

                @Override
                int run(int iterations) throws Throwable {
                    for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
                        double sum = 0;

                        for (int j = 0; j < array.length; j++) {
                            sum += array[j];
                        }
                        System.out.println(sum);
                    }
                    return 0;
                }
            }, new Benchmark("map lookup with printing") {
                Map<String, Double> map = new HashMap<>();
                {
                    map.put("1",    new Double(1));
                    map.put("2",    new Double(2));
                    map.put("3",    new Double(3));
                    map.put("4",    new Double(4));
                    map.put("5",    new Double(5));
                    map.put("6",    new Double(6));
                    map.put("7",    new Double(7));
                    map.put("8",    new Double(8));
                    map.put("9",    new Double(9));
                    map.put("10",   new Double(10));   
                }
                @Override int run(int iterations) throws Throwable {
                    String key = "1";   
                    for (int i=0; i <iterations; i++){
                        double sum = 0; 
                        for (int j =1; j<=map.size(); j++){
                            sum += map.get(key);
                        }
                        System.out.println(sum);
                    }                   
                    return 0;
                }
            }

which prints the following times (if System.out is a file, the numbers for the eclipse console are similar)

array lookup with printing  43301.251 ns
map lookup with printing    18330.935 ns

This is about 100 times more than without printing, so we are chiefly measuring I/O here.

Explanation

An array lookup only involves checking that the array index is valid, adding the index to the base address, and reading a word from memory. In your case, you are even looping over the array, which enables the Java Hotspot VM to skip bounds checking.

The HashMap lookup executes the following code:

public V get(Object key) {
    if (key == null)
        return getForNullKey();
    Entry<K,V> entry = getEntry(key);

    return null == entry ? null : entry.getValue();
}

final Entry<K,V> getEntry(Object key) {
    int hash = (key == null) ? 0 : hash(key);
    for (Entry<K,V> e = table[indexFor(hash, table.length)];
         e != null;
         e = e.next) {
        Object k;
        if (e.hash == hash &&
            ((k = e.key) == key || (key != null && key.equals(k))))
            return e;
    }
    return null;
}

final int hash(Object k) {
    int h = 0;
    if (useAltHashing) {
        if (k instanceof String) {
            return sun.misc.Hashing.stringHash32((String) k);
        }
        h = hashSeed;
    }

    h ^= k.hashCode();

    // This function ensures that hashCodes that differ only by
    // constant multiples at each bit position have a bounded
    // number of collisions (approximately 8 at default load factor).
    h ^= (h >>> 20) ^ (h >>> 12);
    return h ^ (h >>> 7) ^ (h >>> 4);
}

static int indexFor(int h, int length) {
    return h & (length-1);
}

// from String.class
public int hashCode() {
    int h = hash;
    if (h == 0 && value.length > 0) {
        char val[] = value;

        for (int i = 0; i < value.length; i++) {
            h = 31 * h + val[i];
        }
        hash = h;
    }
    return h;
}


public boolean equals(Object anObject) {
    if (this == anObject) {
        return true;
    }
    ... 
}

Even taking into accout that some branches are rarely taken, a map lookup consists of far more operations than an array access. It is not surprising that it takes longer.

Of course, that performance difference hardly ever matters in real code - and the comparison is unfair, as a Map is far more flexible than an array.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I already fixed my post before you posted this one, hehe. Upvoted. P.S. you should still use caliper – durron597 May 1 '13 at 23:30

Yes the expense here is computing the key.

If you know the index there is no reason to use a complex data structure like HashMap instead of a plain array.

You would want to use a HashMap when your key is unknown and based upon the content of the object. So a more valid example would be to start with the object you want to find and to search the array for it, instead of knowing where it is, because that is what the HashMap does.

share|improve this answer
    
I downvoted you because I had done a test that said your answer was wrong, when, in fact, it was not. If you edit your post I'll remove the downvote – durron597 May 1 '13 at 22:58
    
@durron597 thank you for taking the time to do so, I've upvoted your answer as well. – Jean-Bernard Pellerin May 1 '13 at 23:06

get() needs to hash the key, and it also needs to perform an equality comparison on the key (since it's possible that two different keys hashed to the same index in the backing array) - your performance comparison would have been even more lopsided if you'd used more than 10 keys / array elements since this would have increased the average cost of the String#equals method (although you could have avoided this with a HashMap<Integer, Double>)

This is what HashMap#get is doing - the for loop is for the case when the table is storing multiple keys that hashed to the same index in the backing array (something that probably didn't happen in your performance test, meaning that the loop only performs one iteration)

for (Entry<K,V> e = table[indexFor(hash, table.length)]; e != null; e = e.next) {
    Object k;
    if (e.hash == hash && ((k = e.key) == key || key.equals(k)))
        return e.value;
}
share|improve this answer

It's not all that surprising if you understand that under the covers a HashMap is actually a hash table, which scatters your data all over the underlying array, and has to compute an index, look it up in the array and hand it back. An array, on the other hand, is a contiguous block of memory and no computation is involved in finding the location of the index.

Add to that the fact that you are accessing the array in a very predictable order, so prefetching memory, as all modern processors do, is not causing any misses.

share|improve this answer
    
I downvoted you because I had done a test that said your answer was wrong, when, in fact, it was not. If you edit your post I'll remove the downvote – durron597 May 1 '13 at 22:58
    
Any reason for all the downvotes? – Joel May 1 '13 at 23:03
    
I don't know the others, but I downvoted you because I thought it was totally wrong, when, in fact, it was not – durron597 May 1 '13 at 23:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.