Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it a good idea to use a closure instead of __all__ to limit the names exposed by a Python module? This would prevent programmers from accidentally using the wrong name for a module (import urllib; urllib.os.getlogin()) as well as avoiding "from x import *" namespace pollution as __all__.

def _init_module():
   global foo
   import bar
   def foo():
       return bar.baz.operation()
   class Quux(bar.baz.Splort): pass
_init_module(); del _init_module

vs. the same module using __all__:

__all__ = ['foo']
import bar
def foo():
    return bar.baz.operation()
class Quux(bar.baz.Splort): pass

Functions could just adopt this style to avoid polluting the module namespace:

def foo():
    import bar
    bar.baz.operation()

This might be helpful for a large package that wants to help users distinguish its API from the package's use of its and other modules' API during interactive introspection. On the other hand, maybe IPython should simply distinguish names in __all__ during tab completion, and more users should use an IDE that allows them to jump between files to see the definition of each name.

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you use from bar import foo in the code using this module ? I feel like I'm missing something... –  jdb Oct 27 '09 at 18:27
    
the second bit of code does not use the first bit of code. it uses __all__ to define the same module. –  joeforker Oct 27 '09 at 18:33
    
I agree with jdb: how much of a problem is all this? Your _init_module method is very odd, and I don't understand why you would bother? How many developers accidentally use urllib.os.getlogin, for example? Just write your code and solve the real problems. –  Ned Batchelder Oct 27 '09 at 18:47
    
I do not understand your explanation of the advantages of the closure. How does the closure "prevent programmers from accidentally using the wrong name for a module"? If someone uses import foo as bar then they get the name bar, and if they use import foo they get the name foo. What is different about the closure? –  steveha Oct 27 '09 at 19:28
    
I only have experience with this problems from working on Plone because it has so much code that no one is familiar with all of it, especially not an integrator. Before you know it, enough integrators discover a particular name through introspection and if you decide to remove e.g. from zope.app.intid.interfaces import IIntIds from your module then you'll break their modules. When introspecting the API from an IPython shell it's not easy to know whether any particular module-level name is supposed to be interface or implementation. –  joeforker Oct 27 '09 at 19:51

3 Answers 3

I am a fan of writing code that is absolutely as brain-dead simple as it can be.

__all__ is a feature of Python, added explicitly to solve the problem of limiting what names are made visible by a module. When you use it, people immediately understand what you are doing with it.

Your closure trick is very nonstandard, and if I encountered it, I would not immediately understand it. You would need to put in a long comment to explain it, and then you would need to put in another long comment to explain why you did it that way instead of using __all__.

EDIT: Now that I understand the problem a little better, here is an alternate answer.

In Python it is considered good practice to prefix private names with an underscore in a module. If you do from the_module_name import * you will get all the names that do not start with an underscore. So, rather than the closure trick, I would prefer to see correct use of the initial-underscore idiom.

Note that if you use the initial underscore names, you don't even need to use __all__.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that __all__ only helps when you use from x import * which is something you shouldn't do anyway, while the closure trick provides for very concise introspection. In Plone, where any given name is defined somewhere among hundreds of eggs, tens of thousands of python files and millions of lines of code, there's only a small chance that you will actually read my code and have the opportunity to notice either the __all__ or a closure. –  joeforker Oct 27 '09 at 20:20

The problem with from x import * is that it can hide NameErrors which makes trivial bugs hard to track down. "namespace pollution" means adding stuff to the namespace that you have no idea where it came from.

Which is kind of what your closure does too. Plus it might confuse IDEs, outlines, pylint and the like.

Using the "wrong" name for a module is not a real problem either. Module objects are the same from wherever you import them. If the "wrong" name disappears (after a update) it should be clear why and motivate the programmer to do it properly next time. But it doesn't cause bugs.

share|improve this answer
1  
from x import * should only be used in the REPL. Brittle code isn't a bug? –  joeforker Oct 27 '09 at 21:15

Okay, I'm beginning to understand this issue a bit more. The closure really does allow for hiding private stuff. Here's a simple example.

Without the closure:

# module named "foo.py"
def _bar():
    return 5

def foo():
    return _bar() - 2

With the closure:

# module named "fooclosure.py"
def _init_module():
    global foo
    def _bar():
        return 5

    def foo():
        return _bar() - 2

_init_module(); del _init_module

Sample of usage:

>>> import foo
>>> dir(foo)
['__builtins__', '__doc__', '__file__', '__name__', '__package__', '_bar', 'foo']
>>>
>>> import fooclosure
>>> dir(fooclosure)
['__builtins__', '__doc__', '__file__', '__name__', '__package__', 'foo']
>>>

This is actually disturbingly subtle. In the first case, function foo() simply has a reference to the name _bar(), and if you were to remove _bar() from the name space, foo() would stop working. foo() looks up _bar() each and every time it runs.

In contrast, the closure version of foo() works without _bar() existing in the name space. I'm not even certain how it works... is it holding a reference to the function object created for _bar(), or is it holding a reference to a name space that still exists, such that it can look up the name _bar() and find it?

share|improve this answer
    
See stackoverflow.com/questions/739654/… for a more normal use of a closure. In Python 2.x, foo() keeps _bar in foo.func_closure –  joeforker Oct 27 '09 at 21:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.