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I am having trouble understanding what the variables in knn() mean in context of the R function as I don't come from a background of statistics.

Lets say that I am trying to predict a pool race results for each pool A, B, and C.

I know the height and weight of each racing candidate competing in the race. Assuming that the candidates competing are the same every year, I also know who won for the past 30 years.

How would I predict who is going to win at pool A, B, and C this year?

MY guess:

The train argument is a data frame with the columns of weight, height, and pool that he is competing in for each competitor. This is for the last 29 years.

The test argument is a data frame with the columns of weight, height, and pool that he is competing in for each competitor. This is for the last year.

The cl argument is a vector of which competitor won the race each year.

Is this how knn() was intended to be used?

Reference:

http://stat.ethz.ch/R-manual/R-patched/library/class/html/knn.html

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not exactly. Train data is used for training, but test for testing. You can't just train and apply it straight away - you need to cross-validate your model. The aim of model training is not to minimize the error, but to minimize the difference between in-sample and out-of-sample errors. Otherwise you will overfit it: the fact is if you do it good enough your in-sample error will be 0. Which will not give any good results for real prediction. Training set in that function is your in-sample and testing is out-of-sample.

The actual model is then built and you can make a prediction (i.e., for current year) using mymodel.predict().

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