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I'm trying to code a robot, and I'm having a confusing situation. I need to pass an array of pointers to objects to a constructor of a class. I can't, however, populate the array before I pass it into the constructor. To solve this I want to pass a pointer to said array, and access its elements from the pointer. The problem is that I'm new to C++, and so I'm not sure of the syntax. Could you guys help me out?

Code for the main file

class RobotDemo : public SimpleRobot
{
    Joystick stick;
    JoystickOne joyOne;
    Victor *victors [8];
public:
    RobotDemo(void):
        stick(1),
        joyOne(&stick)// these must be initialized in the same order
                // as they are declared above.
                    /*It doesnt seem like I can do anything but initialize things here*/
    {
        /*Populate array with pointers to victors. Will need to update channels*/
        for (int x = 1; x <= 7; x++) {
            victors[x] = new Victor(x);
        }
                    /*And I don't think I can initialize anything here*/
        myRobot.SetExpiration(0.1);
    }

    /**
     * Drive left & right motors for 2 seconds then stop
     */
    void Autonomous(void)
    {
    }

    /**
     * Runs the motors with arcade steering. 
     */
    void OperatorControl(void)
    {
        myRobot.SetSafetyEnabled(true);
        while (IsOperatorControl())
        {
            joyOne.testForActions(); /*Check joystick one for actions*/
            Wait(0.005);                // wait for a motor update time
        }
    }
    /**
     * Runs during test mode
     */
    void Test() {

    }
};

START_ROBOT_CLASS(RobotDemo);

Here's the code for the JoystickInput class, which the JoystickOne class extends

//the .h
#ifndef JOYSTICKINPUT_H
#define JOYSTICKINPUT_H

#include "WPILib.h"

class JoystickInput {
    public:
        JoystickInput(Joystick*);
        JoystickInput(Joystick*, Victor* [8]);
        Joystick * joystick;
        bool buttons [10];
        Victor** victors [8];
        bool buttonClicked(int id);
        virtual void testForActions();
};
#endif

//and the .cpp
#include "JoystickInput.h"

JoystickInput::JoystickInput(Joystick * joy) {
    joystick = joy;
    for (int x = 0; x < 10; x++) {
        buttons[x] = false;
    }
}
JoystickInput::JoystickInput(Joystick * joy, Victor* vicArray [8]) {
    joystick = joy;
    for (int x = 0; x < 10; x++) {
        buttons[x] = false;
    }
    for (int n = 0; n <=7; n++) {
        *victors[n] = vicArray[n];
    }
}

bool JoystickInput::buttonClicked(int id) {
    if (buttons[id] == false and joystick->GetRawButton(id) == true) {
        buttons[id] = true;
        return true;
    } else if (buttons[id] == true and joystick->GetRawButton(id) == false) {
        buttons[id] = false;
        return false;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

void JoystickInput::testForActions() {
}

What I'm asking you guys to help me do is rework the constructor of JoystickInput() so that it also takes a pointer to an array of pointers (to Victors), and performs methods on elements of the array. Googling it hasnt turned up anything useful. I'd research it more myself, but its been a few days and I'm still hung up on this.

Thanks for the help (and if not that, then at least reading my post)!

share|improve this question
1  
typedef Victor*(*array_of_pointers)[8]; array_of_pointers victors; –  Mooing Duck May 1 '13 at 23:23
    
could you elaborate? –  pipsqueaker117 May 1 '13 at 23:28
    
Victor** victors [8]; is hard to wrap my head around, it's an array of eight pointers to Victor*? That's a 3d array? Why are there so many pointers? –  Mooing Duck May 1 '13 at 23:46
    
No, it's (supposed to be) a pointer to an array of pointers to Victors –  pipsqueaker117 May 2 '13 at 0:11
    
And why is it a pointer to an array of pointers? –  Mooing Duck May 2 '13 at 3:32

2 Answers 2

You should be able to use:

JoystickInput(Joystick*, Victor**, int);

and just pass vicArray into the constructor. If victors can be anything else than an array of length 8, then you should also pass the length as an argument because c++ cannot find the length of an array from a pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
Just to clarify, why do you not put a [size] after Victor**? I thought that pointers to arrays of pointers had to be passed with [size] appended –  pipsqueaker117 May 1 '13 at 23:36
    
Also, what would be the difference (and the correct way) to access an element o the array: *victors[i]->Method or just victors[i]-> method? –  pipsqueaker117 May 1 '13 at 23:42
    
@pipsqueaker117: the size is really only needed for 2d arrays, which yours doesn't seem to be. Access would be victors[i]-> –  Mooing Duck May 1 '13 at 23:44
    
Are you saying that the two are equivalent? (for my purposes) –  pipsqueaker117 May 1 '13 at 23:50
    
when you pass an array as an argument, you only pass the pointer to the array, which is a pointer to the first element. –  inifus May 2 '13 at 5:42

Whenever types get complicated (functions or arrays), use a typedef:

typedef char char_buffer_type[8]; //char_buffer_type is an array
typedef char (*char_buffer_ptr)[8]; //char_buffer_ptr is a pointer to an array
typedef char (&char_buffer_ref)[8]; //char_buffer_ref is a reference to an array

typedef int main_type(int, char**); //main_type is a "int(int, char**)" function

typedef Victor*(array_of_ptr)[8]; //array_of_ptr is an array of 8 Victor*

Also, you should name the values 8 and 10.

class JoystickInput {
    public:
        static const int victor_count = 8;
        static const int button_count = 10;
        typedef Victor*(array_of_victor_ptr)[victor_count];

        JoystickInput(Joystick*){}
        JoystickInput(Joystick*, array_of_victor_ptr& vicArray);
        bool buttonClicked(int id){return true;}
        virtual void testForActions(){}

        Joystick * joystick;
        bool buttons [button_count];
        array_of_victor_ptr victors; //that's simpler
};

//then pass this one by reference
JoystickInput::JoystickInput(Joystick * joy, array_of_victor_ptr& vicArray) {
    joystick = joy;
    for (int x = 0; x < button_count; x++) {
        buttons[x] = false;
    }
    for (int n = 0; n < victor_count; n++) {
        victors[n] = vicArray[n]; //don't have to dereference here anymore
    }
}

Proof of compilation. Typedefs are wonderful. Use them.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, thanks for the help. One thing, how would I pass in victors (the variable) from the main file? Do I give it as just victors, as *victors, or &victors? I feel like I would pass &victors, but I wanted your advice / right answer. I'm going to experiment anyways, just asking –  pipsqueaker117 May 1 '13 at 23:50
    
That depends on the type of victors in the main file. If it's an array, then since array_of_victor_ptr& vicArray is a reference to an array, you simply pass victors. If victors is a pointer to an array, then you'd pass *victors. &victors would give you a pointer to an something, which is not what the function is expecting. –  Mooing Duck May 1 '13 at 23:58
    
victors is an array of pointers to Victor objects –  pipsqueaker117 May 2 '13 at 0:02

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