Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Suppose I have the following code:

foreach(string str in someObj.GetMyStrings())
{
    // do some stuff
}

Will someObj.GetMyStrings() be called on every iteration of the loop? Would it be better to do the following instead:

List<string> myStrings = someObj.GetMyStrings();
foreach(string str in myStrings)
{
    // do some stuff
}

?

share|improve this question
19  
Try it and see - Put a breakpoint in GetMyStrings() and see how many times the debugger stops there! – AakashM Oct 27 '09 at 18:38
up vote 39 down vote accepted

The function's only called once, to return an IEnumerator<T>; after that, the MoveNext() method and the Current property are used to iterate through the results:

foreach (Foo f in GetFoos())
{
    // Do stuff
}

is somewhat equivalent to:

using (IEnumerator<Foo> iterator = GetFoos().GetEnumerator())
{
    while (iterator.MoveNext())
    {
        Foo f = iterator.Current;
        // Do stuff
    }
}

Note that the iterator is disposed at the end - this is particularly important for disposing resources from iterator blocks, e.g.:

public IEnumerable<string> GetLines(string file)
{
    using (TextReader reader = File.OpenText(file))
    {
        string line;
        while ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
        {
            yield return line;
        }
    }
}

In the above code, you really want the file to be closed when you finish iterating, and the compiler implements IDisposable cunningly to make that work.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the Dispose discussion. Good stuff. – Fredrik Mörk Oct 27 '09 at 19:29

No.. the function will get called once to get the IEnumerable.. and then there will be repeated call to MoveNext and Current.

share|improve this answer

GetMyStrings() retuns an object of type IEnumerable. The runtime knows how to deal with that. It calls IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() and then on that enumerator object calls MoveNext() and Current.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.