Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two SQL databases / Relational Schema as follows:

Employee(eid, name, office)
Manager(eid, mid)

I'd like to get the following information in SQL. I'd also like to know what the equivalent relational algebra is

  • all employees with 2+ managers
  • all employees with no manager
  • offices of all managers who have an employee named Alice.
share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Ken White, bummi, Clockwork-Muse, OGHaza, Patrick Hofman Mar 28 at 22:43

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What have you tried? Post what you've tried and where you're having trouble and we'd be happy to help. Sounds like a homework assignment to me though... –  sgeddes May 1 '13 at 23:53

1 Answer 1

I'm assuming eid is a primary key in Employee.

SELECT e.eid
FROM Employee e INNER JOIN Manager m ON e.eid = m.eid
GROUP BY e.eid
HAVING COUNT(*) >= 2


SELECT *
FROM Employee e 
WHERE NOT e.eid IN (SELECT eid FROM Manager)


SELECT e2.office
FROM Employee e 
        INNER JOIN Manager m ON e.eid = m.eid 
        INNER JOIN Employee e2 ON m.mid = e.eid
WHERE e.name = 'Alice'
GROUP BY e2.office
share|improve this answer
3  
Can you do my homework next? After that, I have an app to write that someone wants to pay me $$$ for - if I post the requirements for that, will you do it too? –  Ken White May 2 '13 at 0:10
    
If you think the question is inappropriate vote to close it. Don't attack me for trying to help. –  Dylan Smith May 2 '13 at 0:53
    
If I'd been attacking, I would have downvoted. I didn't. I merely commented that sometimes posting the code to answer with no effort being made by the poster to do the work themselves isn't always the best thing to do. If you're willing to do all the work, I've offered to provide more for you to do where I can do nothing and benefit as well. :-) You've "assumed" facts not in the question, provided an "I'll teach you nothing except how to copy and paste code" answer to an obvious homework question, and allowed this poster to cheat to get an unearned grade. Beneficial to whom besides you (rep)? –  Ken White May 2 '13 at 1:04

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.