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I have a struc called player, and I need to make an array of MAX players, so I based on the following page C - initialize array of structs, like so:

DEFINE MAX 200

typedef struct
{
   int ID;
} Player;

Player* PlayerList = malloc(MAX * sizeof(Player));

Problem is I keep getting the following error

error: expected expression before ‘=’ token
error: initializer element is not constant

Base code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define MAX = 200;

typedef struct
{
    int ID;
} Player;

Player *PlayerList;

int start()
{
    PlayerList = malloc(MAX * sizeof(Player));
    return 1;
}

int main(int argc, char const *argv[])
{
    /* code */
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
surrounding code? –  fotanus May 2 '13 at 0:08
    
is PlayerList a defined type, which you're also trying to use as a variable? What is MAX defined as? –  sapi May 2 '13 at 0:09
    
MAX is a defined number. –  Morki May 2 '13 at 0:10
    
Please post short but complete examples - other people should be able to paste your code listing to a file and compile it without changes (or fail to compile, but with exactly the same errors). –  Staven May 2 '13 at 0:13
    
#define MAX = 200; ----> #define MAX 200 –  BLUEPIXY May 2 '13 at 0:36
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can not use only constant for initialization in old type 'C'.

rewrite

Player* PlayerList = malloc(MAX * sizeof(Player));

to

Player* PlayerList;
PlayerList = malloc(MAX * sizeof(Player));

Add E.G.:

#include <stdlib.h>

#define MAX 200

typedef struct
{
   int ID;
} Player;

Player* PlayerList=NULL;

int main(void){
    PlayerList = malloc(MAX * sizeof(Player));
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can I make this global some how? –  Morki May 2 '13 at 0:14
    
@Morki note: You could not write executable statements outside a function. –  BLUEPIXY May 2 '13 at 0:14
    
Can I do something like static PlayerList = malloc(MAX * sizeof(Player)); –  Morki May 2 '13 at 0:16
    
inside a function, yes. But it's not the same thing. –  Elchonon Edelson May 2 '13 at 0:18
    
@Morki I think that you cannot even static, but do not you mean C++?  It is possible if C++ is an explicit cast is required in that case. –  BLUEPIXY May 2 '13 at 0:20
show 5 more comments

You can't call malloc() from outside of any function. Just declare Player* PlayerList;, and let one of the first things you do in main() be PlayerList = malloc(MAX * sizeof(Player));.

share|improve this answer
    
I see. But I need PlayerList to be a global, how would do that. –  Morki May 2 '13 at 0:13
1  
You can declare PlayerList outside of any function, but using a function call (malloc()) to initialize it, that can only be done in a context where function calls are valid. –  Elchonon Edelson May 2 '13 at 0:16
    
You need to show your full code, then. complete, compilable, minimal code sample. –  Elchonon Edelson May 2 '13 at 0:23
1  
And there's the difference! #define MAX = 200; is not the same as #define MAX 200. remember, #define is a token substitution performed by a preprocessor. By the time the compiler tries to actually compile your code, you're now left with PlayerList = malloc(= 200; * sizeof(Player));, which I'm sure you'll agree is nonsensical. –  Elchonon Edelson May 2 '13 at 0:35
1  
Can't do that. You can only free() exactly the things you get from malloc(). You could set PlayerList[2] to some flag value indicating that it's invalid, or you could switch to an entirely different model, and use a linked link to keep your players in. –  Elchonon Edelson May 2 '13 at 1:02
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