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I'm attempting to write an array. Its description is best described by this:

Each day a fisherman will weigh in at most 10 fish, the weight of which you are required to store in an array of double values.

This is what I have so far:

import java.util.*;
import java.text.*;
public class DailyCatch
{
    private int fishermanID, fisherID;
    private String dateOfSample, date;
    private double[] weights;
    private double[] fishCaught = new double[10];
    private int currWeight = 0;

public DailyCatch (int fishermanID, String dateOfSample, String weightsAsString)
{
    fisherID = fishermanID;
    date = dateOfSample;
    // Parse the the weigths string and store the list of weights in this array.
    weights = readWeights(weightsAsString);
}

 public DailyCatch (int fishermanID, String dateOfSample)
 {
    fisherID = fishermanID;
    date = dateOfSample;
 }

 public void addFish(double weight)
 {
    if (currWeight > 10)
    {
     // array full
 }
    else
{
  fishCaught[currWeight] = weight;
  currWeight += 1;  // update current index of array
    }
 }

private double[] readWeights(String weightsAsString) 
{
    String[] weightsArr = weightsAsString.split("\\s+");
    double[] weights = new double[weightsArr.length];

    for (int i = 0; i <  weights.length; i++) {
        double weight = Double.parseDouble(weightsArr[i]);
    }
    return weights;
}

 public void printWeights()
 {
    for (int i = 0; i < fishCaught.length; i++)
  {
    System.out.println(fishCaught[i]);
    } 
 }

public String toString()
{
    return "Fisherman ID: " + fisherID + "\nDate: " + date + "\nWeights: " + Arrays.toString(weights);
}

}

This is the test file I'm working with on this project:

public class BigBass
{
public static void main (String[]args)
{
DailyCatch monday1 = new DailyCatch(32, "4/1/2013", "4.1 5.5 2.3 0.5 4.8 1.5");
System.out.println(monday1);

DailyCatch monday2 = new DailyCatch(44, "4/1/2013");
monday2.addFish(2.1);
monday2.addFish(4.2);
System.out.println(monday2);
}
}

Any help is greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Andrew Barber May 2 '13 at 11:18

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Firstly, you need a default constructor. And it seems to me that you just define an array for fish. –  David May 2 '13 at 0:16
    
Yes. But it gives me an error when I do saying it requires a double and it finds a string. –  Devon Freese May 2 '13 at 0:19
    
Teach a man to allocate an array of double values for his fish, and he'll be fed for a lifetime :) –  Patashu May 2 '13 at 1:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I updated the overloaded constructors to reduce code duplication. Constructors are able to call themselves, which comes hand when multiple constructors are setting the same member variables.

I added the addFish method (as shown in your test) that simply adds the weight to the array based on the current index of the array (which starts at 0). Whenever a new fish weight is added, the currWeight is incremented so that the next fish can be added at the next index.

The readWeights method parses the passed string into tokens that are delimited by a space. Each token is put into the class's fishCaught array be using the addFish method.

public class DailyCatch
{
  private int fishermanID, fisherID;
  private String dateOfSample, date;
  private double[] fishCaught = new double[10];
  private int currWeight = 0;

  public DailyCatch() {  }

  public DailyCatch (int fishermanID, String dateOfSample)
  {
    fisherID = fishermanID;
    date = dateOfSample;
  }

  public DailyCatch (int fishermanID, String dateOfSample, String weight)
  {
    this(fishermanID, dateOfSample);
    readWeights(weight);
  }

  public void addFish(double weight)
  {
    if (currWeight > 10)
    {
       // array full
    }
    else
    {
      fishCaught[currWeight] = weight;
      currWeight += 1;  // update current index of array
    }
  }

  private void readWeights(String weightsAsString) 
  {
    String[] weightsRead = weightsAsString.split("\\s+");
    for (int i = 0; i < weightsRead.length; i++) 
    {
       this.addFish(Double.parseDouble(weightsRead[i]));
    }
  }

  public String toString()
  {
    return "Fisherman ID: " + fisherID + "\nDate:" + date + "\nWeights: " + Arrays.toString(fishCaught);
  }

  public void printWeights()
  {
     for (int i = 0; i < fishCaught.length; i++)
     {
          System.out.println(fishCaught[i]);
     } 
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help. Do you have any idea why I'm unable to print the array? –  Devon Freese May 2 '13 at 0:53
    
@DevonFreese do you want to print it from within the class or outside of it? –  d.moncada May 2 '13 at 0:57
    
I wanted to print it using that toString in there. But I got that working. However, instead of printing the weights declared, it prints out just "0.0". –  Devon Freese May 2 '13 at 1:05
    
@DevonFreese I added a printWeights method (see above). How are you printing? can you paste how you're calling the code? It will either print 0 because you're creating a new DailyCatch object when trying to print (which will have an empty array) or the printing is wrong. –  d.moncada May 2 '13 at 1:09
    
public String toString(){return "Fisherman ID: " + fisherID + "\Date: " + date + \nWeights: " + Arrays.toString(weights); –  Devon Freese May 2 '13 at 1:13
public class DailyCatch
{
    private int fishermanID, fisherID;
    private String dateOfSample, date;
    private double[] weights;

    public DailyCatch (int fishermanID, String dateOfSample, String weightsAsString)
    {
        fisherID = fishermanID;
        date = dateOfSample;
        // Parse the string and store the list of weights in this array.
        weights = readWeights(weightsAsString);
    }

    private double[] readWeights(String weightsAsString) 
    {
        String[] weightsArr = weightsAsString.split("\s+");
        double[] weights = new double[weightsArr.length];

        for (int i = 0; i <  weights.length; i++) {
            double weight = Double.parseDouble(weightsArr[i]);
        }
        return weights;
    }

    public String toString()
    {
        return "Fisherman ID: " + fisherID + "\nDate: " + date + "\nweights: " + Arrays.toString(weights);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
With this I get an error saying there is an illegal escape character having to do with "\s+" –  Devon Freese May 2 '13 at 0:22
    
I am certainly not upvoting this answer in this form. You just dump a bunch of code, not explaining what it does or how to use it. –  Doorknob May 2 '13 at 0:22
    
@DevonFreese use "\\s+" instead –  Doorknob May 2 '13 at 0:23
    
Thanks Doorknob. Now I get this: "DailyCatch.java:27: error: method parseDouble in class Double cannot be applied to given types; double weight = Double.parseDouble(weightsArr); ^ required: String found: String[] reason: actual argument String[] cannot be converted to String by method invocation conversion" Never seen that before. –  Devon Freese May 2 '13 at 0:25
    
@DevonFreese: Now it should go: Double.parseDouble(weightsArr[i]); –  user278064 May 2 '13 at 0:31

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