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So basically when I try to do this

char* inputFileName;
cout<<  "Filename: "; cin>>*inputFileName;

it lets me input the filename but when I press enter I get an unhandled exception error. Any ideas?

edit also if I try

char* inputFileName;
cout<<  "Filename: "; cin>>inputFileName;

i get a debug asseration failed when i try to run it.

share|improve this question
1  
inputFileName is just a (dangling) pointer, it doesn't provide any storage for your string; you have to allocate some memory for the string, as for now you're just telling to cin to write the read characters at a random (potentially invalid) memory location. Study C strings on a book before messing with them. – Matteo Italia May 2 '13 at 1:46
    
@MatteoItalia is right. Also, you should not be dereferencing inputFileName. – Ryan May 2 '13 at 1:50
3  
The proper way is to just not use a char *. That's what std::string is for. – chris May 2 '13 at 1:51
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to pass in the pointer, not the dereferenced pointer, and have allocated memory for the char *

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main(){
    char inputFileName[1024];
    cout << "Filename: ";
    cin >> inputFileName;
    cout << inputFileName << endl;
}

Another option besides char inputFileName[1024]; is

char *inputFileName; 
inputFileName = new char[BUFFER_SIZE];

with BUFFER_SIZE defined somewhere of course, and later

delete [] inputFileName;
share|improve this answer
2  
delete [] (although std::string is really the right answer, imo) – Peter Huene May 2 '13 at 1:54
    
I think using string instead of array of chars could be simpler – cakil May 2 '13 at 1:55
3  
Agreed, I would use std::string, but I was trying to answer the question as asked. – Dr.Tower May 2 '13 at 1:55
2  
It is answering it imo. The OP needs to read in a series of characters and that's what cin >> someString; does (though for a file name, getline would probably be better). cin >> someCharArray; is prone to buffer overflows. If we focused on the most specific question being asked for every question, XY questions would end up terribly and a lot of people would miss out on the fact that there's a much easier and safer way to do what they're trying to do. – chris May 2 '13 at 1:57
    
thanks Dr.Tower – Elliot678 May 2 '13 at 1:58

Try using this:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    char *inputFileName = new char[0];
    cout << "Filename: ";
    cin >> inputFileName;
    cout << inputFileName << endl;
}
share|improve this answer

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