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Basically just want to know what a good way to do this is in python, I have done this before with a kind of bruteforce way also in python but it just doesnt to be the intuitive way. So if anyone could help out it would be good.

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possible duplicate of Adjacency List and Adjacency Matrix in Python –  Ashwini Chaudhary May 2 '13 at 2:29
    
I meant in a sense to make a matrix from a given 2d grid, I understand the implementations and have already implemented graphs. I am just looking for some ways to easily make an adjacency matrix from a 2d grid. –  user2341439 May 2 '13 at 2:52
    
Do you mean: how do I generate the adjacency list of an M x N grid graph? –  Wesley Baugh May 2 '13 at 3:37
    
That would be quite the same i guess. –  user2341439 May 2 '13 at 3:46

2 Answers 2

For the row-by-row grid, the adjacency-matrix looks like this:

  • Within one row, the adjacent numbers form two parallel diagonals. This occupies a Columns × Columns sub-matrix each, repeated along the diagonal of the large matrix.
  • The adjacent rows form one diagonal. This occupies two diagonals, offset just outside the row-sub-matrices.
row 1 row 2 row 3
----- ----- -----  _
A A A 1 . . . . .   |
A A A . 1 . . . .   | row 1
A A A . . 1 . . .  _|
1 . . B B B 1 . .   |
. 1 . B B B . 1 .   | row 2
. . 1 B B B . . 1  _|
. . . 1 . . C C C   |
. . . . 1 . C C C   | row 3
. . . . . 1 C C C  _|

The sub-matrices have two diagonals, on each side of the main diagonal:

column
1 2 3 4 5 6
- - - - - -
. 1 . . . .  1 column
1 . 1 . . .  2
. 1 . 1 . .  3
. . 1 . 1 .  4 
. . . 1 . 1  5
. . . . 1 .  6
def make_matrix(rows, cols):
    n = rows*cols
    M = matrix(n,n)
    for r in xrange(rows):
        for c in xrange(cols):
            i = r*cols + c
            # Two inner diagonals
            if c > 0: M[i-1,i] = M[i,i-1] = 1
            # Two outer diagonals
            if r > 0: M[i-cols,i] = M[i,i-cols] = 1

For a 3 × 4 grid, the matrix looks like:

. 1 . . 1 . . . . . . . 
1 . 1 . . 1 . . . . . . 
. 1 . 1 . . 1 . . . . . 
. . 1 . . . . 1 . . . . 
1 . . . . 1 . . 1 . . . 
. 1 . . 1 . 1 . . 1 . . 
. . 1 . . 1 . 1 . . 1 . 
. . . 1 . . 1 . . . . 1 
. . . . 1 . . . . 1 . . 
. . . . . 1 . . 1 . 1 . 
. . . . . . 1 . . 1 . 1 
. . . . . . . 1 . . 1 . 
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What is the "matrix" function you used in make_matrix? –  Max Mumford Aug 12 '13 at 14:26
    
matrix(r, c) is a constructor that creates an r x c matrix. –  Markus Jarderot Aug 12 '13 at 14:41

I would start by manually generating a few adjacency matrices for a few examples, and see if any (easily programmable) patterns emerge. The adjacency matrix depends on how you label the nodes (in what order), so a different ordering might yield a pattern that is easier or harder to encode in a generating function.

a couple example lattice grid graphs with different structure depending on the node labeling

This is an interesting problem, and though I don't have the exact answer for you right now I will keep thinking (and perhaps this may help lead you or someone else to a solution).

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