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I have the following code for js-learning purposes:

function A() {
    var self = this;

    this.test1 = function() {
        console.log("A_test1");
        B().test2();
        return self;
    } 

    this.problem = function() {
        console.log("I'm never called");
    }

    return self;
}

function B() {
    var self = this;

    this.test2 = function() {
        console.log("B_test2");
        return self;
    }  

    this.problem = function() {
        console.log("I'm a headach and overwrite others in my free time");
    }

    return self;
}

/*
 * This is our "main" function like in C
 */
$(function(){
    A().test1().problem();
});

I have debugged the code with Firebug. Let's examine the line below from "main" function step by step : A().test1().problem();

1) A()
"The keyword "this" isn't a function(class) object. It is always the "window" object, that is extended line by line in the running time by the properties/methods of the current object (in our case: A's function object). So When we reach the end of A() (i.e. "return self"), the "this" object content is the following:

  • all properties/methods of the "window" object
  • test1() and problem() methods of A

2) A().test1()
test1() method has the line "B().test2();". So it calls as next B()

2.1) B()
When we reach the end of B() (i.e. return self), the "this" object content is the following:

  • all properties/methods of the "window" object
  • test1() method of A
    [problem() method of A gets lost, because it is overwritten by the problem() of B]
  • test2() and problem() methods of B

2.2) B().test2()
This runs as expected and is OK. So we are finsihed with A().test1().

3) A().test1().problem();
And this calls the B's problem() method, although i want to call the A's problem() here.

So what is the proper way to save the online state of the "this" object? (It's clear ,that "self" has no effect at all here since it is a reference (like in C) to "this" object.)

I could clone the "this"-object's state at the beginning of every constructor, i.e.:
instead of

var self = this;

how about that

var self = this.clone();

But i'm not sure if it's a good idea. Cause cloning the state of "this" for every newly created object would kill the memory in a large framework, wouldn't it?

I'm sure that i'm not the first person that confrontates with this problem. My Google searche gave me not much. So again what is the proper way to save "this"? How can i let A's problem() get called in this example instead of B's problem()?

share|improve this question
    
you need to use A as constructor ie var a = new A(), then this will point to a new object instead of window –  Arun P Johny May 2 '13 at 4:55
    
@ArunPJohny: Post that as an answer. –  icktoofay May 2 '13 at 4:55
    
@icktoofay done –  Arun P Johny May 2 '13 at 4:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you need to use A as constructor ie var a = new A(), then this will point to a new object instead of window

share|improve this answer
    
Should i always call a function than by using the "new" keyword? Does it have any side effects ? (e.g. like creating duplicate function objects) –  moller1111 May 2 '13 at 5:03
1  
@moller1111 no, if you are working with objects as you are in this case you have to use new –  Arun P Johny May 2 '13 at 5:12
    
thank you. i will accept your answer, because you were first and you answered the additional question as i wanted. For anyone who reads this comment: Please look at the other posts for "self" tip of "Umur Kontacı" and the recommended book link of "jdigital" below. –  moller1111 May 2 '13 at 5:19
var x = new A();

new keyword in javascript has a feature that sets this variable to the new instance. If you just use var x= A(); than this in A function would be window (ie. the global context).

For these simple settings, you do not need to use var self = this; until you need a callback, but for convenience, you can do that without any side effects. Setting a variable's value to this to make it consistent is perfectly right and is very common, the variable's name is usually that instead of self but that's just sugar.

share|improve this answer
    
Function.prototype.bind can sometimes also be used. –  icktoofay May 2 '13 at 4:58
    
thx for the callback tip –  moller1111 May 2 '13 at 5:07
    
@icktoofay bind is in ECMAScript 5; so it is not available on older browsers. Btw, how can you bind it to a new object (ie. replicate new)? –  Umur Kontacı May 2 '13 at 5:28
1  
Sorry, I wasn't saying you could replicate new. I was saying that rather than using a that variable you could use bind. As for browser compatibility, it is easily shimmed. –  icktoofay May 2 '13 at 5:52

If you call new on your function then this will, in fact, be an instance of the object and not the window... so...

function Foo(){
   this.whatAmI = function(){
         console.log("I am " + this);  
   }
}


var bar = new Foo();
bar.whatAmI();
share|improve this answer

The other answers ("use new") are right.

I think you would benefit from John Resig's works. Take a look at his book (Secrets of the Javascript Ninja) or check out the interactive Javascript tutorial on his web site.

share|improve this answer
    
Should i always call a function than by using the "new" keyword? Does it have any side effects ? (e.g. like creating duplicate function objects) –  moller1111 May 2 '13 at 5:06
    
No you shouldn't. That's why I suggested looking at the educational materials -- so that you can gain a better understanding of how this works. –  jdigital May 2 '13 at 5:07

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