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I have a 2D array containing integers (both positive or negative). Each row represents the values over time for a particular spatial site, whereas each column represents values for various spatial sites for a given time.

So if the array is like:

1 3 4 2 2 7
5 2 2 1 4 1
3 3 2 2 1 1

The result should be

1 3 2 2 2 1

Note that when there are multiple values for mode, any one (selected randomly) may be set as mode.

I can iterate over the columns finding mode one at a time but I was hoping numpy might have some in-built function to do that. Or if there is a trick to find that efficiently without looping.

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1  
@tom10: You mean scipy.stats.mode(), right? The other one seems to output a masked array. –  fgb May 2 '13 at 5:53
    
@fgb: right, thanks for the correction (and +1 for your answer). –  tom10 May 2 '13 at 19:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Check scipy.stats.mode() (inspired by @tom10's comment):

import numpy as np
from scipy import stats

a = np.array([[1, 3, 4, 2, 2, 7],
              [5, 2, 2, 1, 4, 1],
              [3, 3, 2, 2, 1, 1]])

stats.mode(a)

Output:

(array([[ 1.,  3.,  2.,  2.,  1.,  1.]]),
 array([[ 1.,  2.,  2.,  2.,  1.,  2.]]))
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So numpy by itself does not support any such functionality? –  Nik May 2 '13 at 6:51
1  
Apparently not, but scipy's implementation relies only on numpy, so you could just copy that code into your own function. –  fgb May 2 '13 at 6:53
2  
Just a note, for people who look at this in the future: you need to import scipy.stats explicitly, it is not included when you simply do an import scipy. –  ffledgling Aug 15 '13 at 12:42

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