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These are simple methods for creating "delegates" in Java:

public static <B> Runnable runnableOf(B o, String methodName) {
    return findMethod(methodName, o.getClass(), o);
}
public static <B> Runnable runnableOf(Class<B> base, String methodName) {
    return findMethod(methodName, base, null);
}

There are two cases in this code: when B (the class for the method to call) is not Class<?>, the user shall pass an instance of B and thus the method will be an instance method. Otherwise, the user can pass a Class<B> to call a static method.

However, the compiler complains that they are ambiguous. I think one of the solution is to force B in the first overload NOT to be an instance of Class<?>. How can I do so?

UPDATE

The solution of the above code is given in my own answer. However it is not answering the question in title. I hope anybody can answer it and give another examples that makes sense.

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What is your compiler version. Eclipse-Compiler doesnt complain –  Jatin May 2 '13 at 6:32
    
Java 6, not Java 7. –  Earth Engine May 2 '13 at 6:32
    
Java 6 SE and Eclipse JDT compiler both don't complain –  Jeremy Unruh May 2 '13 at 6:32
    
No compilation errors seen. Can you try by deleteing old .class filed and then creating new .class files. –  Vineet Singla May 2 '13 at 6:34
    
The ambiguous is in findMethod, not runnableOf. Sorry about that. –  Earth Engine May 2 '13 at 6:40
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1 Answer

Sorry that's a mistake. The problem is that findMethod do not know what is the type of null. So the fix is the following:

public static <B> Runnable runnableOf(Class<B> base, String methodName) {
    return findMethod(methodName, base, (B)null);
}

I don't know weather or not people can do what I described in the title, however in my example it is NOT necessory.

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