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I have some records in dictionary, I need to sort the data based on Created Date (CDate) and Modified Date(MDate). While creating the record, my CDate will have current datetime, but MDate will be 1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM.

This is the sample data and code used for sorting.

CDate MDate
4/30/2013 4:43:41 PM 4/30/2013 4:46:47 PM
4/30/2013 4:43:28 PM 4/30/2013 4:46:36 PM
4/30/2013 4:43:54 PM 4/30/2013 4:46:16 PM
4/30/2013 5:03:13 PM 1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM

Code:

FileSchedulerEntities = FileSchedulerEntities
                       .OrderByDescending(pair => pair.Value.MDate)
                       .ThenByDescending(pair => pair.Value.CDate)
                       .ToDictionary(pair => pair.Key, pair => pair.Value);

As per sorting, I need sorted data in descending order like this.
CDate MDate
4/30/2013 5:03:13 PM 1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM
4/30/2013 4:43:41 PM 4/30/2013 4:46:47 PM
4/30/2013 4:43:28 PM 4/30/2013 4:46:36 PM
4/30/2013 4:43:54 PM 4/30/2013 4:46:16 PM

But the aforementioned code is not working. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
i think you cannot sort a dictionary. why don't you play around with List<KeyValuePair<string, string>> –  naveen May 2 '13 at 7:27
    
@naveen - If dictionary is unsortable, Then what's the advantage of OrderByDescending() & ThenByDescending()? –  mlg May 2 '13 at 7:50
    
@MidhunlalG: Please see the long comment on my answer. It answers this question. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 2 '13 at 8:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The order of items in a dictionary is undefined as per the documentation:

The order in which the items are returned is undefined.

If you need a structure that allows for O(1) access via a key, use Dictionary<TKey, TValue>.
If you need an ordered structure, use something like List<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.

share|improve this answer
    
But I'm manually sorting the data. But the sorting is not working as expected. –  mlg May 2 '13 at 7:27
5  
@MidhunlalG: Because after the sorting, you are storing the data back into a dictionary, effectifly losing all sorting you just performed. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 2 '13 at 7:28
    
If dictionary is unsortable, Then what's the advantage of OrderByDescending() & ThenByDescending()? –  mlg May 2 '13 at 7:52
    
I tried with this code also, without storing back to dictionary. FileSchedulerEntities .OrderByDescending(pair => pair.Value.MDate) .ThenByDescending(pair => pair.Value.CDate);. But no luck. –  mlg May 2 '13 at 7:54
1  
@MidhunlalG: OrderBy and similarly named methods are extension methods on IEnumerable<T>. Dictionary<TKey, TValue> implements IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>. That's the reason why those extension methods are available on a dictionary. Calling them will result in an IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> that is ordered the way you specified. So it makes sense that they are here. Your mistake is the call to ToDictionary(). This will create a dictionary out of the sorted enumerable. But this conversion is not lossles, because (cont.) –  Daniel Hilgarth May 2 '13 at 8:15

Try a SortedDictionary.

You can create your own ToSortedDictionary<(this IEnumerable source, Func keySelector, Func elementSelector, IEqualityComparer comparer):

public static SortedDictionary<TKey, TElement> ToSortedDictionary<TSource, TKey, TElement>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
    Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector,
    Func<TSource, TElement> elementSelector,
    IEqualityComparer<TKey> comparer)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    }

    if (keySelector == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("keySelector");
    }

    if (elementSelector == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("elementSelector");
    }

    var dictionary = new SortedDictionary<TKey, TElement>(comparer);
    foreach (TSource local in source)
    {
        dictionary.Add(keySelector(local), elementSelector(local));
    }

    return dictionary;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This answer misses a crucial point: This wouldn't retain the ordering created by OrderBy et al. It would order by what ever the comparer sees as the correct order. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 2 '13 at 10:50
    
Than it's an even more specialized dictionary you're looking for and you'll need to implement it yourself. –  Paulo Morgado May 5 '13 at 23:57
    
But that's the whole point of the question ;-) –  Daniel Hilgarth May 6 '13 at 8:00
    
I thought the question was about the dictionary returned by ToDictionary not being ordered as you wanted. Since it is how it is by design, you are now sure you have to implement it yourself. Or is now the question "how to implement it?" If so, we need to know your requirements to help. Do you need sorting on the values or do you need sorting on the keys? –  Paulo Morgado May 6 '13 at 8:33
    
Paulo, I am not the person asking the question. I am the person that provided the accepted answer. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 6 '13 at 8:37

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