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I have written a DLL in dev C++. The DLL's name is "DllMain.dll" and it contains two functions: HelloWorld and ShowMe. The header file looks like this:

DLLIMPORT  void HelloWorld();
DLLIMPORT void ShowMe();

And the source file looks like this:

DLLIMPORT void HelloWorld ()
{
  MessageBox (0, "Hello World from DLL!\n", "Hi",MB_ICONINFORMATION);
}

DLLIMPORT void ShowMe()
{
 MessageBox (0, "How are u?", "Hi", MB_ICONINFORMATION);
}

I compile the code into a DLL and call the two functions from C#. The C# code looks like this:

[DllImport("DllMain.dll", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
public static extern void HelloWorld();

[DllImport("DllMain.dll", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
public static extern void ShowMe();

When I call the function "HelloWorld" it runs well and pops up a messageBox, but when I call the function ShowMe an EntryPointNotFoundException occurs. How do I avoid this exception? Do I need to add extern "C" in the header file?

share|improve this question
    
Can you please post your C++ code? –  Chris Neave May 2 '13 at 9:20
    
You should probably change the calling convention to CallingConvention.StdCall. –  Henrik May 2 '13 at 10:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The following code in VS 2012 worked fine:

#include <Windows.h>
extern "C"
{
    __declspec(dllexport) void HelloWorld ()
    {
        MessageBox (0, L"Hello World from DLL!\n", L"Hi",MB_ICONINFORMATION);
    }
    __declspec(dllexport) void ShowMe()
    {
        MessageBox (0, L"How are u?", L"Hi", MB_ICONINFORMATION);
    }
}

NOTE: If I remove the extern "C" I get exception.

share|improve this answer
    
ok,I have change the code and the problem is solved.thanks very much. –  user1333098 May 3 '13 at 6:54
    
It doesn't answer how to call C++ (i.e. mangled code) functions from C#. –  Hi-Angel Oct 1 at 15:15
    
@Hi-Angel I don't know what a mangled code is and how to call it from C#. If you'd like to complete my answer please post a comment or you could post your own answer. –  atoMerz Oct 1 at 19:43
    
@atoMerz I'd like to know the answer :D Well, from what I found yesterday — for I was looking for it — the only way is to find the mangled names in a dll, and write these instead of an usual ones. But of course it wouldn't be portable as a name mangling isn't standardized, and so GCC's one not compatible with Visual Studio one, and both incompatible with ICC, and etc.Probably if you want to use both the compilers, you have to try at first a function name of one compiler, catch an exception for the case was no such a function, and try a function name of a next compiler, something like this. –  Hi-Angel Oct 2 at 3:00
    
@atoMerz btw, that's funny to me that you were the one, who solved the question by the directive extern "C"{}, which just removes a name mangling from an object file, but you still don't know what the name mangling is :D In C++ compiler can't name a function to be in an object just like «HelloWorld», because here's could be two function of the same name that receives different argument types. «Name mangling» is the thing to solve this: it appends some symbols to the name of the function based on it's own algorithm. And this algorithms (and the resulting names) differ in a compilers. –  Hi-Angel Oct 2 at 3:15
using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace MyNameSpace
{
    public class MyClass
    {
        [DllImport("DllMain.dll", EntryPoint = "HelloWorld")]
        public static extern void HelloWorld();

        [DllImport("DllMain.dll", EntryPoint = "ShowMe")]
        public static extern void ShowMe();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
ok,I have change the code and the problem is solved.thanks very much. –  user1333098 May 3 '13 at 6:55
    
It won't work as the "HelloWorld" in the dynamic library is mangled. –  Hi-Angel Oct 1 at 15:40

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