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I've been reading nodebegginer And I came across the following two pieces of code.

The first one:

    var result = database.query("SELECT * FROM hugetable");
    console.log("Hello World");

The second one.

    database.query("SELECT * FROM hugetable", function(rows) {
       var result = rows;
    });
    console.log("Hello World");

I get what they're supposed to do, they query the database to retrieve the answer to the query. And then console.log('Hello world').

The first one is supposedly synchronous code. And the second one is asynchronous code.

The difference between the two pieces is very vague to me. What would the output be?

Googling on asynchronous programming didn't help me either.

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8  
Stange you didn't find anything with google, it's a rather big subject. In synchronous programming, each step is performed one after the previous one is finished executing. In asynchroneous, step 2 will be performed even if step 1 isn't finished. The function you see defined in your second example is called a callBack function, and will be ran as soon as the result from the database will be returned, which will probably be after the console.log is ran. –  Bartdude May 2 '13 at 11:04
2  
@Bartdude There was a lot on asynchronous programming, but no somewhat simple explanation on what it is, and what it means in practice. –  Azeirah May 2 '13 at 11:18
    
Avoid synchronous functions, even during initialization and shutdown –  Gabriel Llamas May 2 '13 at 14:09
    
@GabrielLlamas Why should we avoid synchronous functions? –  Charlie Parker Feb 9 at 1:02
3  
@CharlieParker Because they block the event loop and you're losing all the benefits from an asynchronous evented I/O model. And because it's a bad practice. Think about it this way: If you're not using asynchronous functions, why are you using Node.js? –  Gabriel Llamas Feb 9 at 9:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 35 down vote accepted

The difference is that in the first example, the program will block in the first line. The next line (console.log) will have to wait.

In the second example, the console.log will be executed WHILE the query is being processed. That is, the query will be processed in the background, while your program is doing other things, and once the query data is ready, you will do whatever you want with it.

So, in a nutshell:

The first example will block, while the second wont.

The output of the following two examples:

//example 1
var result = database.query("SELECT * FROM hugetable");
console.log("query finished");
console.log("Next line");


//example 2
database.query("SELECT * FROM hugetable", function(rows) {
    console.log("query finished");
});
console.log("Next line");

Would be:

  1. query finished
    Next line
  2. Next line
    query finished
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3  
So basically, when I execute the first piece of code, it will do something like this: request query.; 5 seconds later when the request is done; console.log; when the second one executes: request query; console.log; work on the query; –  Azeirah May 2 '13 at 11:04
    
yep, that's it. –  TheBronx May 2 '13 at 11:08
    
@TheBronx Doesn't the query method have to be written in an "asynchronous way" or is the sql query run on a different process (non-node thread) so that's why it doesn't block the node thread? –  JohnGalt Oct 20 '13 at 17:08
1  
@JohnGalt the sql runs on a different thread. But of course that depends on the implementation of the sql driver you use. The driver should spawn a new thread, connect to mysql and run the query. Once done, post the result to the event queue, and Node will call the callback. –  TheBronx Oct 21 '13 at 7:36
1  
Isn't it possible for the async example to output the same thing as #1? Like for instance, database.query finishes so fast that by the time we reach console.log the task is already done. –  greatwolf Nov 19 '13 at 22:44

The difference between these two approaches is as follows:

Synchronous way: It waits for each operation to complete, after that only it executes the next operation. For your query: The console.log() command will not be executed until & unless the query has finished executing to get all the result from Database.

Asynchronous way: It never waits for each operation to complete, rather it executes all operations in the first GO only. The result of each operation will be handled once the result is available. For your query: The console.log() command will be executed soon after the Database.Query() method. While the Database query runs in the background and loads the result once it is finished retrieving the data.

Use cases

  1. If your operations are not doing very heavy lifting like querying huge data from DB then go ahead with Synchronous way otherwise Asynchronous way.

  2. In Asynchronous way you can show some Progress indicator to the user while in background you can continuw with your heavy weight works. This is an ideal scenario for GUI apps.

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1  
Does that mean that db.query(cmd, callback) is running concurrently (as in threads)? Are they running at the same time? –  Charlie Parker Feb 9 at 0:41

This would become a bit more clear if you add a line to both examples:

var result = database.query("SELECT * FROM hugetable");
console.log(result.length);
console.log("Hello World");

The second one:

database.query("SELECT * FROM hugetable", function(rows) {
   var result = rows;
   console.log(result.length);
});
console.log("Hello World");

Try running these, and you’ll notice that the first (synchronous) example, the result.length will be printed out BEFORE the 'Hello World' line. In the second (the asynchronous) example, the result.length will (most likely) be printed AFTER the "Hello World" line.

That's because in the second example, the database.query is run asynchronously in the background, and the script continues straightaway with the "Hello World". The console.log(result.length) is only executed when the database query has completed.

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you say: the result.length will (most likely) be printed AFTER the "Hello World" line. .... why would that be only "most likely"? I think it is always printed after the console.log output. Thanks for clarification :) –  humanityANDpeace Jan 18 at 16:50
    
@humanityANDpeace: that's the entire point of asynchronous access: you don't know when it will be done. Perhaps it's an absurdly fast database, and the database query returns even before Javascript gets to the "Hello World" line... –  Martijn Jan 19 at 10:12

In the synchronous case, the console.log command is not executed until the SQL query has finished executing.

In the asynchronous case, the console.log command will be directly executed. The result of the query will then be stored by the "callback" function sometime afterwards.

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But are the actually being called simultaneously? The thing that confuses me is, in asynchronous code, is the actual code being run at the same time in parallel? –  Charlie Parker Feb 9 at 1:03
    
This depends on the processor (is it multi-core?) and the operating system. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multithreading_(software)#Multithreading –  related Feb 17 at 10:02

The main difference is with asynchronous programming, you don't stop execution otherwise. You can continue executing other code while the 'request' is being made.

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