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I'm creating a product ID conversion app. I have two models representing the two ID styles:

class Id1(models.Model):
    number = models.CharField(max_length=10)
    converted = models.CharField(max_length=13)
    status = models.CharField(max_length=5) # validation status
    error = models.CharField(max_length=10) # error message

    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.number

class Id2(models.Model):
    number = models.CharField(max_length=13)
    converted = models.CharField(max_length=10)
    status = models.CharField(max_length=5) # validation status
    error = models.CharField(max_length=10) # error message

    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.number

There is a third-party Python (non-Django) module that I'd like to incorporate into the Django models for two reasons:

  1. It already provides the conversion functionality I need
  2. I want to use an OO approach in doing the conversion - I create an instance of a class (e.g. Id1) that encapsulates the relevant data and methods for that instance.

The third-party module has the following classes with several fields and methods each:

  • class Id(object)
  • class Id1(Id)
  • class Id2(Id)

... and the following top-level functions which the class methods invoke:

  • def validate
  • def convert
  • def calculate_checksum
  • def cleanse

However, I don't want the third-party module's attributes in the database; each database table should only contain the Django model fields (number and converted).

How can this be achieved? If this isn't possible, what are some alternative ways to approach this problem? Delegate logic to the view?

[EDIT] I forgot to add that I'd like to use the module methods to initialize some of the fields like "converted", "status", and "error". Any idea how to do this?

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It's not really clear what you are asking here. Do you want to use the existing code to do the conversion / calculation? Then why don't you just call those functions etc. from within methods on the model? –  UloPe May 2 '13 at 12:53
    
You're right. I forgot to mention a crucial aspect: I want to save the method return values back as model fields. So the custom save() method will include code from the module such as converting Id1 to Id2 and saving the result in "converted" field. Validation and conversion exceptions will affect two other fields "status" and "error". All this happens automatically at object initialization or save. Possible? –  geeljire May 3 '13 at 0:02
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, there might be several approaches:

First, you can import the module and encapsulate their relevant logic inside custom methods inside your model object like this:

import module
class Id1(models.Model):

    ...

    def custom_validate_method(self):
        # instantiate modules classes needed
        # write the logic needed

Then you will be able to call this method with any instance of Id1 class. Or you may as well override the save() method to perform some extra logic when you try to persist the object like this:

    def custom_validate_method(self):
        # instantiate modules classes needed
        # write the logic needed

    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        # perform logic (maybe call custom_validate_method)
        return super(Id1, self).save(*args, **kwargs)

You may also use multiple inheritance to achieve this but watch it, multiple inheritance can bring some name conflicts. It would look like this:

import module
class Id1(models.Model, module.Class):
number = models.CharField(max_length=10)
converted = models.CharField(max_length=13)

def __unicode__(self):
    return self.number

There you have the functionality of the class you need in the module inherited in your Id1 class.

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I tried multiple inheritance, but it complains that __init__ requires 2 arguments and that I'm giving it 1. When I give it 2 (incld a dummy string), it says I gave it 3 instead of 2. Also, your direction was helpful in understanding that you can use custom methods in the model from the imported module. However, I want to save the return values of these methods in model fields as well. Is that possible? For example, upon initializing an Id1 object with a number and saving it, I want to autoconvert it to Id2 and save it as the second field "converted". Thanks much Paulo. Great help! –  geeljire May 2 '13 at 23:56
    
No problem, I'm glad you could solve it. Of course you can assign return values to fields. If you want to do it from within the class the you do this: self.number = 3 and then when you do self.save() it will save 3 to the database. For a method is the same: self.number = custom_method(). About the __init__ arguments. With multiple inheritance you should override __init__ and then call each super class's __init__ within the ovrrided __init__ to avoid these problems. –  Paulo Bu May 3 '13 at 1:04
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