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This is rather interesting, I think. Consider following code, both the window.onload and body onload="" call the same function. However, the results are different. It appears to me that window.onload has a problem with collections. Here's the code:

<html>
<script type="text/javascript">

	window.onload = getSpanElements();

	function getSpanElements(){
		var collectionBoolean = document.getElementsByTagName("span")?true:false;
		alert(
			"collection exists? " + collectionBoolean + "; number of collection members: " + document.getElementsByTagName("span").length
		);
	}


</script>
<head>
	<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
	<title>Untitled Document</title>
</head>
<body onload="getSpanElements()">
	<span> test </span>
</body>

As you can see, both report that the collection exists, however window.onload reports that it has no members. Any ideas?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You're setting the function wrong:

window.onload = getSpanElements();

should be

window.onload = getSpanElements;

You're setting the onload handler to the return value of getSpanElements() at the moment.

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absolutely right! thanks :) –  Andrej Marinic Oct 27 '09 at 22:09
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window.onload = getSpanElements();

should be

window.onload = getSpanElements;

The code you have calls the getSpanElements function and assigns its return value as the onload event handler.

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absolutely right! thanks :) –  Andrej Marinic Oct 27 '09 at 22:09
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You're wrongly doing this:

window.onload = getSpanElements();

which sets the window.onload to the result of the call to the function getSpanElements (undefined).

You should do this instead:

window.onload = getSpanElements;
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1  
actually, the function returns undefined, not null –  Christoph Oct 27 '09 at 22:08
    
Edited now, thanks Christoph :) –  Seb Oct 27 '09 at 22:09
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You might want to move your window.onload assignment below the getSpanElements declaration:

<html>
<script type="text/javascript">


        function getSpanElements(){
                var collectionBoolean = document.getElementsByTagName("span")?true:false;
                alert(
                        "collection exists? " + collectionBoolean + "; number of collection members: " + document.getElementsByTagName("span").length
                );
        }

        window.onload = getSpanElements;

</script>
<head>
        <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
        <title>Untitled Document</title>
</head>
<body onload="getSpanElements()">
        <span> test </span>
</body>

At the point in your code where you're assigning the window.onload event handler, getSpanElements() has not yet been defined. Also, the line should be

window.onload=getSpanElements;

not

window.onload=getSpanElements();

The function name without parentheses is a reference to the function. With parentheses, it executes the function and the return value is assigned to window.onload.

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2  
Since getSpanElements is defined with the function statement rather than the function expression, it is subject to hoisting — so it doesn't need appear before the assignment in the code order. –  Quentin Oct 27 '09 at 22:09
    
yes, i made a call instead of a reference. thank you! –  Andrej Marinic Oct 27 '09 at 22:10
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You have to assign a reference to the function getSpanElements to window.onload - currently, the function doesn't get executed onload, but immediately after parsing.

What you actually assign is the undefined return value.

In short: drop the ().

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I think the window object is created before any actual elements are parsed.

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i would assume so as well, however it is well aware that the collection exists, that is what confuses me. –  Andrej Marinic Oct 27 '09 at 22:03
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