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I am having a terrible time with learning Perl regular expressions. I am trying to :

  • Replace all occurrences of a single # at the beginning of a line with: #####.
  • Replace all occurrences of a full line of # characters (ignoring leading or trailing spaces) with
    # ---------- #.

I know its s/# but that's all I know and all I can find. Any suggestions.

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possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1030787/… I think you need to also define what is after the lines that already contains # is it followed by space or alphabet since what you do not want to do is replace those that already are ##### with duplicate ##### –  vahid May 2 '13 at 13:54

2 Answers 2

The beginning of a line is matched by ^. Therefore, a line starting with a # is matched by

/^#/

If you want the # to be single, i.e. not followed by another #, you must add a negative character class:

/^#[^#]/

We do not want to replace the character following the #, so we will replace it with a non matching group (called negative look-ahead):

/^#(?!#)/

To add the replacement, just change it to

s/^#(?!#)/#####/

The full line can be matched by the following regular expression:

/^#+$/

Plus means "once or more", ^ and $ have already been explained. We just have to ignore the leading and trailing spaces (* means "zero or more"):

/^ *#+ *$/

We do not want the spaces to be replaced, so we have to keep them. Parentheses create "capture groups" that are numbered from 1:

s/^( *)#+( *)$/$1# ---------- #$2/
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Don't you need to pick up the second character and add it to the replacement (or it will get replaced)? s/^#([^#])|^#$/#####\1/ –  Klas Lindbäck May 2 '13 at 14:04
    
@KlasLindbäck: Indeed. I started with look-ahead but removed it later to simplify things :) So back to the original version. –  choroba May 2 '13 at 14:06
    
Anyway, you get a +1 from me for the excellent explanation. –  Klas Lindbäck May 2 '13 at 14:15
    
/^#(?!#)/ is more correct for the first one than /^#(?=[^#])/ –  hobbs May 2 '13 at 14:30
    
@hobbs: Also true, thanks. Updated. –  choroba May 2 '13 at 14:34

For your first replacement:

$line =~ s/^#/#####/;

The idea here is that you want any line that starts with a '#'. The '^' in the regex says that what follows must be at the beginning of the string.

And for your second replacement:

$line =~ s/^#+$/# ---------- #/;

This uses '^' again and '$'. The '$' at the end says that what comes before must go to the end of the string. '#+' says that there must be one or more '#' characters. So, in other words, the entire string must consist of '#'.

Here's a test script and run:

$ cat foo.pl
#! /usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @lines = (
        "foo line",
        "# single comment",
        "another line",
        "#############",
        "# line",
        "############",
);

foreach my $line( @lines ){
        print "ORIGINAL:  $line\n";
        $line =~ s/^#/#####/;
        $line =~ s/^#+$/# ---------- #/;
        print "NEW:       $line\n";
        print "\n";
}

$ ./foo.pl
ORIGINAL:  foo line
NEW:       foo line

ORIGINAL:  # single comment
NEW:       ##### single comment

ORIGINAL:  another line
NEW:       another line

ORIGINAL:  #############
NEW:       # ---------- #

ORIGINAL:  # line
NEW:       ##### line

ORIGINAL:  ############
NEW:       # ---------- #
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice running example, here it is live : tryperl.com/#5502408 –  gideon May 2 '13 at 14:04
    
Not sure if the assignment was supposed to be this hard, but ## Double comment shouldn't be replaced if I understand the question correctly. If this is supposed to be a "comment beautifier" then the person writing the question might not have considered the possibility of line starting with two hashes. –  Klas Lindbäck May 2 '13 at 14:14
    
true. i think i mentally distinguished "single comment" from "lone comment" when i answered. oh natural language. i think @choroba sufficiently covered what's necessary though. –  Christopher Neylan May 2 '13 at 14:38

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