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Here is an example for illustration:

x = data.frame(x1=1:3, x2=2:4, x3=3:5)
x
#   x1 x2 x3
# 1  1  2  3
# 2  2  3  4
# 3  3  4  5
x[2, 1] = NA
x[3, 2] = NA
complete.cases(x)
# [1]  TRUE FALSE FALSE
x[complete.cases(x), , drop=FALSE]
#   x1 x2 x3
# 1  1  2  3

What if instead complete cases, I want to filter for complete variables (columns)? In the example above it should be something like:

x[,3,drop=FALSE]
#   x3
# 1  3
# 2  4
# 3  5
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migrated from stats.stackexchange.com May 2 '13 at 14:35

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Or something like this:

 x[, complete.cases(t(x)), drop=FALSE] # Tks Simon
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1  
+1 the simple ones are the best ones. I'd wrap with a x[] to return what the OP wants, i.e. x[complete.cases(t(x))] –  Simon O'Hanlon May 2 '13 at 14:55

You can do something like this :

R> x[,sapply(x, function(v) sum(is.na(v))==0), drop=FALSE]
  x3
1  3
2  4
3  5
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I'm sure there's a cleaner strategy here, but I think the following function will also work:

x = data.frame(x1=1:3, x2=2:4, x3=3:5)
x[2, 1] = NA
x[3, 2] = NA

complete.cols = function(dat){   
  non.missing.test = apply(dat,2,function(t){sum(is.na(t))==0})
  dat.complete.cols = data.frame(dat[,which(non.missing.test == TRUE)])
  names(dat.complete.cols) = names(dat)[which(non.missing.test == TRUE)]
  return(dat.complete.cols)
}

complete.cols(x)
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This little function should work:

for (a in c(1:length(x))){
    ifelse(TRUE%in%is.na(x[,a]),print ('INCOMPLETE'),print ('COMPLETE'))
}
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 complete.col <- function(col) sum(is.na(col))==0
 dfrm[ sapply(dfrm, complete.col) ]
 #or almost equivalently
 dfrm[ ,   ]

 #If you wanted the numbers of the columns with no missing
 which( sapply(dfrm, complete.col) )

 # To wrap `sapply` around the function on a single column functions
 complete.cols <- function(dfrm) sapply(dfrm, function(col) sum(is.na(col))==0)
 x[ complete.cols(x) ]
#--------
  x3
1  3
2  4
3  5
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You can use sapply to check the columns for missing values and subset using that result:

x[sapply(x,function(y) !any(is.na(y)))]
  x3
1  3
2  4
3  5
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