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I am reading the following line from a file using fgets:

#C one two three four five six seven eight nine ten eleven

Each word (except #C) is a column heading. So there are eleven columns in my file.

My aim is to divide this line into tokens of each word. Also, I need to count that there are 11 column headings. (There can be more or less column headings than 11)

My problem is with the spaces at the end of this line. Here is the code i am using:

while(1){
fgets(buffer,1024,filename);
if (buffer[1] == 'C'){
    char* str = buffer+2;
    char* pch;
    pch = strtok(str," ");
    while(pch != NULL){
        pch = strtok (NULL, " ");
        if (pch == NULL)break; //without this, ncol contains +1 the 
                               //amount of columns.
            ncol++;
    }
    break;
}
}

This code gives me ncol = 11. And works fine.(Note that there is a single space at the end of the line i am reading)

However, if i have NO space at the end of the line, then it gives ncol = 10 and does not read the last column.

My aim is to get ncol =11 regardless of whether there are any spaces at the end of not. I just want to read the last word, check if there is any more word and if there isn't, then exit.

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4 Answers 4

if you change this loop:

while(pch != NULL){
    pch = strtok (NULL, " ");
    if (pch == NULL)break; //without this, ncol contains +1 the 
                           //amount of columns.
        ncol++;
}

to:

while(pch != NULL){
    char *keep = pch;
    pch = strtok (NULL, " ");
    if (pch == NULL)
    {
       if (strlen(keep)) 
       {
           ncol++;
       }
       break; //without this, ncol contains +1 the 
    }
    //amount of columns.
    ncol++;
}

So, if there is something left in the string, when pch is NULL, then you have another string, so increement ncol in the if. [You may find that if the input file is not "wellformed" the if (strlen(keep)) needs to be more thorough, but I'm assuming your input is "nice"]

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You could just check if the token is set:

if (pch == NULL || *pch == '\0') break;
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What is the difference between NULL and \0 ? @Philip –  detraveller May 2 '13 at 15:05
1  
@detraveller: NULL is a pointer value, '\0' is a character. Actually your compiler makes the int 0 out of both, so it's just for clarification. *pch == '\0' is the fastest way to check if the string is of length 0. –  Philip Dahnen May 2 '13 at 15:09

another solution, more flexible, need c++11 support

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

template <typename Result, typename StringType>
void split(StringType const& contents, Result &result, StringType const& delimiters = "\n")
{
    typedef typename Result::value_type value_type;

    static_assert(std::is_same<value_type, StringType>::value, "std::is_same<value_type, StringType>::value == false,\n"
                  "The value_type of Result should be the same as StringType");

    typename StringType::size_type pos, last_pos = 0;
    while(true)
    {
        pos = contents.find_first_of(delimiters, last_pos);
        if(pos == StringType::npos)
        {
            pos = contents.length();

            if(pos != last_pos)
                result.emplace_back(contents.data() + last_pos, pos - last_pos);

            break;
        }
        else
        {
            if(pos != last_pos)
                result.emplace_back(contents.data() + last_pos, pos - last_pos );
        }

        last_pos = pos + 1;
    }
}

int main()
{             
    std::string const input = "#C one two three four five six seven eight nine ten eleven";
    std::vector<std::string> results;
    split(input, results, std::string(" "));
    for(auto const &data : results){
        std::cout<<data<<std::endl;
    }    

    return 0;
}
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You are getting the different count with and without space at the end because the function fgets includes the newline character it read from the file.

So when there is a space at the end of line the newline character is considered as a separate token.

To overcome this you should include newline characters '\r' & '\n' into the tokens provided to strtok function, and remote the if (pch == NULL)break; line.

So the code will be;

while(1){
    fgets(buffer,1024,filename);
    if (buffer[1] == 'C'){
        char* str = buffer+2;
        char* pch;
        pch = strtok(str," \r\n");
        while(pch != NULL){
            pch = strtok (NULL, " \r\n");
            //amount of columns.
            ncol++;
        }
        break;
    }
}
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