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I have a R data.table that looks like the below table

    User_ID Exec_No Job_No
1:    2      1      1   
2:    2      2      2 
3:    3      2      3
4:    1      2      4
5:    1      1      5
6:    3      2      6
7:    2      2      7
8:    1      1      8

Now, for different combinations of (User_ID,Exec_No) I need a vector of all Job_No that fall into the category.

 list (
   list(User_ID = 2, Exec_No = 1, Job_Nos = c(1)) ,
   list(User_ID = 2, Exec_No = 2, Job_Nos = c(2,7)) ,
   list(User_ID =3, Exec_No = 2, Job_Nos = c(3,6)) ,
   list(User_ID =1, Exec_No = 2, Job_Nos = c(4)) ,
   list(User_ID =1, Exec_No = 1, Job_Nos = c(5,8)) 
 ) 

I would prefer the output of the operation to be a list of lists.

How do I achieve this in R in a quick manner considering that the input data.table will have around half a million rows?

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Hi, it is not very clear what is your starting input and what is your desired output. Could you please clarify –  Ricardo Saporta May 2 '13 at 14:50
    
@RicardoSaporta I have edited my question. –  Anirudh Nair May 2 '13 at 15:03
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here you go:

dt = data.table(user.id = c(2,2,3,1,1,3,2,1), exec.no = c(1,2,2,2,1,2,2,1), job.no = c(1:8))

dt[, list(result = list(list(user.id = user.id,
                             exec.no = exec.no,
                             job.nos = job.no))),
     by = list(user.id, exec.no)][, result]
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+1 - Nice. I still find it hard to get my head round DT syntax. Please can you show how you would do it to get the result I got from using ddply? i.e. a data.table where the result row is a list of the job numbers? I just could not figure that out. –  Simon O'Hanlon May 2 '13 at 15:26
    
Got it! dt[ , list(result = list(job.nos = job.no)),by = list(user.id, exec.no)] Thanks - I (mostly) see what you did now. –  Simon O'Hanlon May 2 '13 at 15:29
    
Yeah, wow, that's a lot of nested lists. Although the OP requested a list of lists, I think the output of dt[,list(list_o_jobnos=list(unique(job.no))),by="user.id,exec.no"] looks much cleaner. –  Frank May 2 '13 at 15:53
    
@Frank yeah, I don't use lists of lists very often, so not really sure why OP would want that, but regardless I think it's useful to understand how to get those out of a data.table –  eddi May 2 '13 at 15:57
    
@Frank I agree too. List of lists is an overkill. I'm going with what you suggested. –  Anirudh Nair May 2 '13 at 16:37
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I think what you are looking for is something like this, but again it is hard to tell from the question:

setkey(DT, "User_ID", "Exec_No")

getJobNo <- function(U, E) 
  DT[.(U, E)][, unlist(Job_No)]


getJobNo(3, 2)
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You cold use plyr for this, although I think it will be a bit slow for your needs. To return what you originally had pasted you can use ddply...

ddply( DT , .(User_ID,Exec_No) , summarise , "Job_Nos" = list(Job_No)  )
#  User_ID Exec_No Job_Nos
#1       1       1    5, 8
#2       1       2       4
#3       2       1       1
#4       2       2    2, 7
#5       3       2    3, 6

Or for a list of results how about dlply...

dlply( DT , .(User_ID,Exec_No) , summarise , "User" = User_ID , "Exec" = Exec_No , "Job_Nos" = unique(Job_No)  )

#$`1.1`
#  User Exec Job_Nos
#1    1    1       5
#2    1    1       8

#$`1.2`
#  User Exec Job_Nos
#1    1    2       4

#$`2.1`
#  User Exec Job_Nos
#1    2    1       1

#$`2.2`
#  User Exec Job_Nos
#1    2    2       2
#2    2    2       7

#$`3.2`
#  User Exec Job_Nos
#1    3    2       3
#2    3    2       6
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