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I have a WCF service that defines a FaultContract:

[OperationContract]
[FaultContract(typeof(InvalidOperationException))]
[FaultContract(typeof(NotSupportedException))]
[FaultContract(typeof(Exception))]
GetSysIdsResponse GetSysIds(string id); 

The WCF service catches an exceptional case (null pointer exception) and throws my FaultException:

try
        {
             ....
        }            }
        catch (InvalidOperationException ex)
        {
            // The specified DirectoryEntry is not a container
            throw new FaultException<InvalidOperationException>(ex);
        }
        catch (NotSupportedException ex)
        {
            // Search is not supported by the provider that is being used
            throw new FaultException<NotSupportedException>(ex);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw new FaultException<Exception>(ex);
        }

It throws the last one. The thing is that it never gets to the client. First o9f all, "Fault contracts are published as part of the service metadata." I do not see it in the client metadata after I add the Service Reference. Here is the client code. It never hits the catch block catch (FaultException e) It just says the FaultException is uncaught by the user. It does catch the CommunicationException. I don't know what I am doing wrong?

try
                {
                    response = client.GetSysIds("sgentil");
                }
                catch (FaultException<Exception> e)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("FaultException<Exception>: " + e.Detail);
                    client.Abort();
                    return;
                }
                catch (FaultException e)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("FaultException: " + e.Message);
                    client.Abort();
                    return;
                }
                catch (CommunicationException ex)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("CommunicationsException");
                    client.Abort();
                    return;
                }

** I tried the approach of the first answer and defined two exceptions:

[DataContract]
    public class SystemFault
    {
        [DataMember]
        public string SystemOperation { get; set; }
        [DataMember]
        public string SystemReason { get; set; }
        [DataMember]
        public string SystemMessage { get; set; }
    }

    [DataContract]
    public class DatabaseFault
    {
        [DataMember]
        public string DbOperation { get; set; }
        [DataMember]
        public string DbReason { get; set; }
        [DataMember]
        public string DbMessage { get; set; }
    }

I then applied it:

[FaultContract(typeof(SystemFault))]
        GetSysIdsResponse GetSysIds(string id);

Then threw it:

 catch (Exception ex)
            {
                SystemFault sf = new SystemFault
                    {
                        SystemOperation = "GetSystemIds",
                        SystemMessage = "Exception while obtaining AD user properties",
                        SystemReason = ex.Message
                    };
                throw new FaultException<SystemFault>(sf);
            }

The client DOES now see the SystemFault type and has that metadata:

 catch(FaultException<SystemFault> sf)
                {
                   Console.WriteLine("SystemFault {0}: {1}\n{2}",
                       sf.Detail.SystemOperation, sf.Detail.SystemMessage,
                       sf.Detail.SystemReason);
                }

Yet still execution stops in the server at the line:

throw new FaultException<SystemFault>(sf);

It says: FaultException'1 not handled by user code

Now what?

share|improve this question
    
When you say "execution stops in the server" are you referring to when running in Visual Studio? If so, that is expected behaviour. You can just hit f5 to continue running, and see what happens in the client. If you clear the checkbox, you can tell it not to break on this kind of exception in the future. – Avrohom Yisroel May 4 '15 at 16:48

The problem is that you are specifying that your FaultContract is of type XXXException. This will not work I think, you must create a custom FaultContract of your own, for example:

[DataContract]
public class InitializationFault
{
    public InitializationFault(Exception exc, string msg)
    {
        Exception = exc;
        Message = msg;
    }

    [DataMember]
    public Exception Exception { get; set; }

    [DataMember]
    public string Message { get; set; }
}

then your ServiceContract becomes:

[OperationContract]
[FaultContract(typeof(InitializationFault))]
//..more
GetSysIdsResponse GetSysIds(string id); 

and your client side code becomes:

try
{
    response = client.GetSysIds("sgentil");
}
catch (FaultException<InitializationFault> e)
{
     Console.WriteLine("FaultException<InitializationFault>: " + e.Detail);
    //more
}
share|improve this answer
    
Are sure? Juval Lowy does it with the .NET DivideByZeroException – Sam Gentile May 2 '13 at 15:09
    
Tried your approach. See my edits above – Sam Gentile May 2 '13 at 15:47
    
Hmm, that is strange. I've just tried a small project to test it out and here it works. I can make a call to the method which throws the FaultException, and I make consecutive calls to another one. Do you have a lot of custom configuration set by any chance? – RoelF May 3 '13 at 7:56

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