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This question might be too noob, but I was still not able to figure out how to do it properly.

I have a given array [0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,2,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,1,2,1,0,2,3] (arbitrary elements from 0-5) and I want to have a counter for the occurence of zeros in a row.

1 times 6 zeros in a row
1 times 4 zeros in a row
2 times 1 zero  in a row

=> (2,0,0,1,0,1)

So the dictionary consists out of n*0 values as the index and the counter as the value.

The final array consists of 500+ million values that are unsorted like the one above.

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what have you tried? did it work? why not? –  jbabey May 2 '13 at 15:16
    
=> (2,0,0,1,0,1) ??? what does this have to do with 6, 4 and 1 zeros in a row? –  dansalmo May 2 '13 at 15:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should get you what you want:

import numpy as np

a = [0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,2,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,1,2,1,0,2,3]

# Find indexes of all zeroes
index_zeroes = np.where(np.array(a) == 0)[0]

# Find discontinuities in indexes, denoting separated groups of zeroes
# Note: Adding True at the end because otherwise the last zero is ignored
index_zeroes_disc = np.where(np.hstack((np.diff(index_zeroes) != 1, True)))[0]

# Count the number of zeroes in each group
# Note: Adding 0 at the start so first group of zeroes is counted
count_zeroes = np.diff(np.hstack((0, index_zeroes_disc + 1)))

# Count the number of groups with the same number of zeroes
groups_of_n_zeroes = {}
for count in count_zeroes:
    if groups_of_n_zeroes.has_key(count):
        groups_of_n_zeroes[count] += 1
    else:
        groups_of_n_zeroes[count] = 1

groups_of_n_zeroes holds:

{1: 2, 4: 1, 6: 1}
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Thank you very much! Indeed it helped a lot! –  nit May 6 '13 at 8:48

This seems awfully complicated, but I can't seem to find anything better:

>>> l = [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 2, 1, 0, 2, 3]

>>> import itertools
>>> seq = [len(list(j)) for i, j in itertools.groupby(l) if i == 0]
>>> seq
[6, 4, 1, 1]

>>> import collections
>>> counter = collections.Counter(seq)
>>> [counter.get(i, 0) for i in xrange(1, max(counter) + 1)]
[2, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1]
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Similar to @fgb's, but with a more numpythonic handling of the counting of the occurrences:

items = np.array([0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,2,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,1,2,1,0,2,3])
group_end_idx = np.concatenate(([-1],
                                np.nonzero(np.diff(items == 0))[0],
                                [len(items)-1]))
group_len = np.diff(group_end_idx)
zero_lens = group_len[::2] if items[0] == 0 else group_len[1::2]
counts = np.bincount(zero_lens)

>>> counts[1:]
array([2, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1], dtype=int64)
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I like this approach using only numpy functions. Thanks a lot for the input! –  nit May 6 '13 at 8:48

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