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I am working with the basic Knuth 4.3.1 Algorithm M to do arbitrary precision multiplication on the natural numbers. My implementation in Java is below. The problem is that it is generating leading zeroes, seemingly as a side effect of the algorithm not knowing whether a given result has two places or one. For example, 2 x 3 = 6 (one digit), but 4 x 7 = 28 (two digits). The algorithm seems to always reserve two digits which results in leading zeroes.

My question is two-fold: (1) Is my algorithm a correct implementation of M, or am I doing something wrong which is unnecessarily creating leading zeroes, and (2) If it is an unavoidable side effect of M that it produces leading zeroes, then how can we adjust or use an improved algorithm to avoid leading zeroes.

// Knuth M algorithm 4.3.1
final public static void multiplyDecimals( int[] decimalM1, int[] decimalN1, int[] result, int radix ){
    Arrays.fill( result, 0 );
    int lenM = decimalM1[0];
    int lenN = decimalN1[0];
    result[0] = lenM + lenN; 
    int iStepM = lenM;
    while( iStepM > 0 ){
        int iStepN = lenN;
        int iCarry = 0;
        while( iStepN > 0 ){
            int iPartial = decimalM1[iStepM] * decimalN1[iStepN] + result[iStepM + iStepN] + iCarry;
            result[iStepM + iStepN] = iPartial % radix;
            iCarry = iPartial / radix;
            iStepN--;
        }
        result[iStepM] = iCarry;
        iStepM--;
    }
    return;
}

Output of the algorithm showing factorials being generated which shows the leading zeroes.

1 01
2 002
3 0006
4 00024
5 000120
6 0000720
7 00005040
8 000040320
9 0000362880
10 000003628800
11 00000039916800
12 0000000479001600
13 000000006227020800
14 00000000087178291200
15 0000000001307674368000
16 000000000020922789888000
17 00000000000355687428096000
18 0000000000006402373705728000
19 000000000000121645100408832000
20 00000000000002432902008176640000
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any reason to not use BigInteger? Is this an assignment? –  sjr May 2 '13 at 15:19
    
It shouldn't be too difficult to trim leading zeros (from the source numbers) before multiplication (you can modify the algorithm to basically just skip them). In this case, there may still be some zeros (as a result of the last multiplication), but not that many. An alternative is reversing the digits (thus least-significant-digit first) and correcting the length after multiplication. –  Dukeling May 2 '13 at 15:33
1  
The length of result is sum of lengths of parameters, so 1 x 1 = 01. Leading zeros should be removed manually after multiplication. –  Egor Skriptunoff May 2 '13 at 15:33
    
You'll need the method to return an int[] result rather than passing in result as a parameter, so that the method can determine the appropriate length for result. Then you can either use System.arraycopy to copy the result (sans leading zeros) to a new array before returning it, or else you can use a linked list to hold the result's digits and then create a result array out of the linked list when the loop terminates - I don't know which would be more efficient (probably System.arraycopy). –  Zim-Zam O'Pootertoot May 2 '13 at 15:36
    
I suspect that you would encounter this leading zeros problem with any arbitrary precision integer multiplication algorithm - even if there were a clever way to precisely determine the length of the result ahead of time, the cost of doing so would almost certainly exceed the cost of a System.arraycopy to remove the zeros at the end –  Zim-Zam O'Pootertoot May 2 '13 at 15:51

3 Answers 3

The algorithm isn't allocating any leading zeros at all. You are. You're providing the output array, and filling it with zeros too. Knuth Algorithm M doesn't do that.

In addition:

  1. You should certainly skip all the leading zeros in both numbers. This can have a massive effect on performance, as it's an O(MN) algorithm. The sum of the final M and N is nearly the correct number of output digits; the final step after multiplication is to remove possibly one leading zero.

  2. You can also skip the inner loop if the current M digit is zero. This is Knuth's step M2. Note that a zero digit occurs more frequently in numbers in nature than 1/10: there's a law about this that says each digit 1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9 is successively less likely.

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Okay, so aside from M2, if my algorithm is not a correct implementation of M, where is it wrong. Your answer seems to differ from comingstorm's. –  Tyler Durden May 3 '13 at 15:04

Each individual multiplication allocates enough space for the worst case input. Allocating for the worst case is the right thing to do here, because in general you won't know for sure if your result has a leading zero until you've finished doing your multiplication!

To prevent the cascading effect of redundant leading zeros in your question, check for leading zeroes after you have performed the multiplication, and reduce the length accordingly. Note that, if neither of your inputs has any leading zeroes, the result of their multiplication should have no more than one. However, this is not true for, say, subtraction (which can obviously generate as many leading zeroes as you like!).

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The problem with doing this is that because the array is in read order in the algorithm, the most significant digit is on the left, which means to eliminate the leading zero I have to shift the whole set of numbers to the left, which is kind of a performance hit. –  Tyler Durden May 3 '13 at 15:06
    
Don't shift the numbers -- just change the indices you use, something like while(iStepM > iMsdM) and so forth. If you don't do something like that, you will just have to live with your leading zeroes, which is a much bigger performance hit. –  comingstorm May 3 '13 at 17:02
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I figured out how to solve the problem. The program needs to be modified as follows:

final public static int multiplyDecimals( int[] decimalM1, int[] decimalN1, int[] result, int radix ){
    Arrays.fill( result, 0 );
    int lenM = decimalM1[0];
    int lenN = decimalN1[0];
    result[0] = lenM + lenN; 
    int iStepM = lenM;
    while( iStepM > 0 ){
        int iStepN = lenN;
        int iCarry = 0;
        while( iStepN > 0 ){
            int iPartial = decimalM1[iStepM] * decimalN1[iStepN] + result[iStepM + iStepN] + iCarry;
            result[iStepM + iStepN] = iPartial % radix;
            iCarry = iPartial / radix;
            iStepN--;
        }
        result[iStepM] = iCarry;
        iStepM--;
    }
    int xFirstDigit = 1;
    while( result[xFirstDigit] == 0 ) xFirstDigit++;
    if( xFirstDigit > 1 ){
        int ctDigits = result[0] - xFirstDigit + 1;
        for( int xDigit = 1; xDigit <= ctDigits; xDigit++ ) result[xDigit] = result[xDigit + xFirstDigit - 1];
        result[0] = ctDigits;
    }
    return result[0];
}
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