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What is the advantage of using a list comprehension over a for loop in Python?

Is it mainly to make it more humanly readable, or are there other reasons to use a list comprehension instead of a loop?

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I think they're faster than for loops in most (if not all) cases. That is, aside from the beauty of them :) –  BenDundee May 2 '13 at 15:21
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advantage over what? –  Markus Unterwaditzer May 2 '13 at 15:22
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Why is this being down-voted? –  BenDundee May 2 '13 at 15:25
    
"We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or specific expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion." Seems that this question can be supported with "specific facts [and] specific expertise". Marking it to be closed is BS, IMO. –  BenDundee May 2 '13 at 15:37
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On second thought, that's not a "not constructive" question, moreover, has not been asked in this form previously (comparing to this), voting for reopening. –  bereal May 2 '13 at 15:40
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1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

List comprehensions are more compact and faster than an explicit for loop building a list:

def slower():
    result = []
    for elem in some_iterable:
        result.append(elem)
    return result

def faster():
    return [elem for elem in some_iterable]

This is because calling .append() on a list causes the list object to grow (in chunks) to make space for new elements individually, while the list comprehension gathers all elements first before creating the list to fit the elements in one go:

>>> some_iterable = range(1000)
>>> import timeit
>>> timeit.timeit('f()', 'from __main__ import slower as f', number=10000)
1.4456570148468018
>>> timeit.timeit('f()', 'from __main__ import faster as f', number=10000)
0.49323201179504395
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They also make the above code clearer. (I think you cover that already by calling them "explicit".) –  Steven Rumbalski May 2 '13 at 15:27
    
Awesome. Thanks a lot for a great answer. –  David May 2 '13 at 15:28
    
Very useful answer –  doukremt May 2 '13 at 15:34
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